Essays on Advanced Business Process Management Case Study

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The paper 'Advanced Business Process Management' is a great example of a  Business Case Study. Business process management is an imperative aspect that is undertaken in each and every organization. This is considering the fact that every organization has diverse processes that go on therein. These processes, therefore, have to be managed and analyzed accordingly. Various scholars have come up with hierarchies used to analyze business processes, workflow, work, and human activity. (Ryan, 2009) These analytical hierarchies are made of different layers. One of the hierarchies consists of the goal at the topmost level, it then branches to four sections of criterion and then each of the four branches to three alternatives.

In this case, the goal represents the parent node of the four criteria. This also clearly shows that the illustrated criteria are the children of the goal. (Saaty, 2010)   It then narrows down to the fact that the three alternatives are the children of each criterion or each criterion is a parent to three major alternatives. The other analytical hierarchy process consists of four major layers. The topmost layer has the goal, followed by four criteria.

These branches to the sub-criteria then finally to the alternatives. The priorities are defined as the figures related to the analytical process nodes. They show the relative weights of any group’ s nodes. The numbers are usually absolute in nature. That is they do not have units. This means that a goal has a priority of one thousand. In this case, the local priorities clearly illustrate the comparative weights of the nodes found in a sibling group in relation to the parent. (Briol, 2008) This clearly shows that each and every cluster of criteria’ s local priorities and that of the sibling sub-criteria sum up to one thousand.

There are then the global priorities in this hierarchy. The global priorities in this hierarchy are sourced through the multiplication of the global priority of the parent by the sibling’ s local priorities. It is imperative to note that the sum of all sub- criteria’ s global priorities in this analytical hierarchy is one thousand. This analytical hierarchy has a rule that is usually adhered to. This is the concept that all child node global priorities have to add up to the parent’ s global priority.

This means that the local priorities found in a group of children should sum up to one thousand. 1.1 1st analytic hierarchy process This analytic hierarchy process consists of the goal at the topmost level, it then branches to four sections of criterion and then each of the four branches to three alternatives.   Source: (Saaty, 2010) 1.2 2nd analytic hierarchy process The topmost layer of this analytic hierarchy process has the goal, followed by four criteria. These branches to the sub-criteria then finally to the alternatives.   Source: (Saaty, 2010) 2.0 Discussion An overall analysis of the hierarchies shows that the first hierarchy is simpler in its definition of the terms used to describe the hierarchical layers.

The term parent and children are simply used to illustrate the hierarchical layers in the analytical hierarchy process. The second hierarchy that has four layers has no clear definitions of the hierarchical layers. (Sun, 2005)

References

Ambler, S. (2004): The Object Primer: Agile Model Driven Development with UML 2. Cambridge University Press

Briol P. (2008): BPMN, the Business Process Modeling Notation Pocket Handbook. LuLu Press

Debevoise, N. et al. (2008): The MicroGuide to Process Modeling in BPMN. BookSurge Publishing

Grosskopf, D. (2009): The Process: Business Process Modeling using BPMN. Meghan Kiffer Press

McCaffrey, J. (2005): Test Run: The Analytic Hierarchy Process; MSDN Magazine

Perez et al. (2006): Another Potential Shortcoming of AHP; TOP: An Official Journal of the Spanish Society of Statistics and Operations Research, Volume 14:1 Springer Berlin/Heidelberg

Ryan K. (2009): A computer scientist's introductory guide to business process management (BPM), ACM Crossroads 15(4); ACM Press

Saaty, T. (2010): Principia Mathematica Decernendi: Mathematical Principles of Decision Making. Pittsburgh; Pennsylvania; RWS Publications

Sun, H. (2005): AHP in China; in Levy; Jason; Proceedings of the 8th International Symposium on the Analytic Hierarchy Process. Honolulu, Hawaii

Vom, B. and Rosemann, M. (2010): Handbook on Business Process Management: Strategic Alignment, Governance, People and Culture (International Handbooks on Information Systems) (Vol. 1). Berlin: Springer

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