Essays on The Making and Maintenance of CEOs in Large Australian Firms Case Study

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The paper "The Making and Maintenance of CEOs in Large Australian Firms" is a good example of a management case study. Australia just like any other country has firms. Some are small; others are medium and some are large. The large firms in Australia are headed mostly by older white males. One may ask him/herself a question; what do we mean when we say ‘ old’ , ‘ white’ and ‘ male’ ? The word ‘ old’ is an adjective. This word is used to talk about the age of something or someone. When talking about an old person, we say that he/she has lived for a long time and that he/she cannot be called young (Pham, Suchard, & Zein, 2011). The word white, on the other hand, is an adjective, a noun and a verb depending on its use in context.

When used as a noun and as an adjective, the aspect of color is very much applicable here. When talking about white people, this mostly refers to those who are of US origin (Rindfleish & Sheridan, 2003). The word male, on its part, is both an adjective and a noun depending on how the speaker or the writer is using it.

It also refers to any sex that does not give birth is male. This word relates mostly to men since it is at times synonymously used in place of man. Therefore, when we talk of a person being male, we are saying that the person is not a person but a man of any age (Rindfleish & Sheridan, 2003). Therefore, when we talk about an old white male one should get a picture of what category of people w are talking in Australia.

We are talking about men whose skin color is white and people who have advanced in age (Stimpert, Duhaime, & Chesley, 2010 p208-223). A large firm is any business or organization that is big enough to be able to outdo other firms. It expands in such a way that it benefits from the economies of scale. In most cases, the organizational structure in large firms is complex. The number of employees is big to be able to give their services ad skills to the many departments that characterize most of these large firms.

In return, these employees are paid for their novel input in the development and success of these large firms. Payments may be made daily. There are those employees who are either paid weekly or monthly. Other employers are paid on a contract basis. Whichever the type of employment agreement that guarantees the rights and freedoms of each person in these large firms, the truth is that the turnovers of these firms are usually high (Mats Alvesson, 2009). From the brief descriptions of the terms above, it is clear that we are talking about old white men in the context of large firms.

In Australia, large firms have their topmost employers being these white men who have advanced in age. They are the most people who are the CEOs of these large firms. Different sources paint a picture of large Australian firms that have continued to perpetuate the undesirable features of gender discrimination, age discrimination and racism as well. Recruitment in these firms is discriminatory (Rongrong Chen Affiliation: Department of Accounting and Finance at Macquarie University in Sydney, Maria Cadiz Dyball Affiliation: Accounting at Macquarie University in Sydney, & Univer, 2009).

The concept of age is not a new phenomenon in Australia. It is a widespread phenomenon in this country. As far as the process of recruitment is concerned, Australians have very bizarre stories regarding their experiences in the recruitment process. People are discriminated on the basis of how old or young depending on the type of job they are applying for (Chen, Dyball, & Wright, 2009). The more you advance Large in Australia the less likely t is for you to land a new job of choice.

The Federal Discrimination Act 2004 seems not to have been able to check out this issue and come up with a lasting solution and remedy. The Australian Human Rights Commission is trying to look on this issue. The most unfortunate thing is that this commission has not been able to end this Australian workplace vice.

References

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Broderick, E. (2010). Age discrimination –. Sydney: Australian Human Rights Commission.

Chen, R., Dyball, M. C., & Wright, S. (2009). The Link Between Board Composition and Corporate Diversification in Australian Corporations. Corporate Governance: An International Review, v17 n2 (March 2009): 208-223 , 17 (2), 208-223.

COLIC-PEISKER, V. (2006). Employment Niches for Recent Refugees:Segmented Labour Market in Twenty-first. Journal of Refugee Studies , 19 (2), 1-24.

Mats Alvesson, T. B. (2009). Business and Management, Human Resource Management, Organizational Theory. In K. L. Ashcraft, The Oxford Handbook of Critical Management Studies. Oxford Handbooks Online:.

Murray, P., & Syed, J. (2005). Critical issues in managing age diversity in Australia. Asia Pacific Journal of Human Resources , 43 (2), 210-224.

Peretz, M., & McGraw, P. (2011). Trends in Australian human resource development practice, 1996-2009. Asia Pacific Journal of Human Resources , 49 (1), 36-54.

Pham, P., Suchard, J.-A., & Zein, J. (2011). Corporate governance and alternative performance measures: evidence from Australian firms. Australian Journal of Management , 3, 371-386.

Rindfleish, J., & Sheridan, A. (2003). No change from within: senior women managers’ response to gendered organizational structures. Women in Management Review , 18 (6), 299-310.

Rongrong Chen Affiliation: Department of Accounting and Finance at Macquarie University in Sydney, A., Maria Cadiz Dyball Affiliation: Accounting at Macquarie University in Sydney, A., & Univer, S. W. (2009). The Link Between Board Composition and Corporate Diversification in Australian Corporations. Corporate Governance: An International Review , 17 (2), 208-223.

Shekhar, C., & Stapledon, G. ( 2007). Governance Structures of Initial Public Offerings in Australia. Corporate Governance: An International Review, : 1177-1189 , 15 (6), 1177-1189.

Sheridan, A. (2002). What you know and who you know: “successful” women’s experiences of accessing board positions. Career Development International , 7 (4), 203-210.

Stimpert, J. L., Duhaime, I., & Chesley, J. (2010). Learning to Manage a Large Diversified Firm. Journal of Leadership & Organizational Studies , 17 (4), 411-425.

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