What You Don't Know About Making Decisions – Article Example

What You Need to Know About Making Decisions College What You Need to Know About Making Decisions Making decisions is an attempt that many companies and institutions fail in many instances. Many companies collapse when the leaders take on individual approaches that constantly lead them to generating poor results. Leaders in business and organizations perceive decision making the wrong way. The main explanation for this is the fact that they have a tendency of treating decision making as an event of advocacy. This simply implies to decision making in a distinct moment in time. However, the reality is that making decisions is never a short event. On the other hand, it is a progression that develops in days, weeks and months or years of inquiry.
Making decision needs enough time of preparedness where a leader takes his or her time to make inquiries about a problem and in the end comes up with the best way out. This should include the application of constructive conflict, consideration and closure. These are factors that break down the inquiry process of decision making. With constructive conflict, leaders take their time to involve every member of staff in collaborative discussion/consideration and critical thinking where balanced argument finally helps them come up with influential decision1.
In conclusion, decision making requires backing from the rest of the company members. Furthermore, particularly when it comes to executing decisions. This is for the reason that studies show that the number of business leaders who come up with good decisions and those who fail to are outstanding. Leaders who stick to making decisions alone, on impulse and without adequate preparedness often fail to meet their set goals in businesses. On the other hand, leaders who take their ample time to make inquiries, prepare well, engage in collaborative discussions and constructive conflict often make solid decisions that amount to tangible results.
Bibliography
David A. Garvin and Michael A. Roberto (2009) What You Dont Know About Making Decisions
(HBR OnPoint Enhanced Edition)