Essays on Marketing Research Analysis Coursework

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The paper "Marketing Research Analysis" is a great example of marketing coursework.   Based on the records from data collected, different scales are used to classify data to make the analysis easier. Based on the choice of data collection, scales are used in assigning degrees of confidence to the data. To begin with the statistical scale variation, statisticians hold that data can neither be ordered nor measured but can be assigned to a given category. Nominal scale, therefore, assigns data into categories based on the factors that they have in common.

An example from the data is to show the number of visits to the website. Data can also be classified into ordinal scale, which assigns variable into degrees of measurement. This is the most commonly used scale in statistics, and it entails classifying variables into good, bad, worse and so on. Statistical variables are sometimes not quantifiable hence; the use of scales serves as the best method in relating different variables (Bush, 2010). Interval scale entails that a given magnitude on the unit scale of measurement represents the equal variation of data under consideration.

Interval scale has the weakness that values cannot be assigned the absolute zero value, but only be compared based on the scale. An illustration of an interval scale is demonstrated by the comparison of values with the same intervals say between 23 and 24 or between 30 and 31. The difference between the two sets of examples is equal hence; they have the same interval scale (Bush, 2010). The ratio scale classifies variables that are equidistantly placed and takes account of the meaningful zero. The scale may be used to consider, for example, the variations of data after every two years (Bush, 2010).

Researchers mostly use ratio scale when they collect quantitative data, and this is achieved by grouping the respondents into the same categories like comparing age, and the income of the respondents. 2. Descriptive analysis of the questionnaire. Question1.number of people visiting an auto online web site. Statistics Visited Auto Online Web Site in past 3 months? N Valid Missing 1400 0 Mean 1.00 Median 1.00 Mode 1 Sum 1400 Percentiles 25 50 1.00 1.00   75 1.00   Visited Auto Online Web Site in past 3 months?   Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative Percent Valid Yes 1400 100.0 100.0 Question2. Internet purchases Descriptive Statistics   N Minimum Maximum Mean Std. Deviation I think purchasing items from the Internet is safe. 1400 1 5 2.82 1.302 How often do you make purchases through the Internet? 1400 1 5 2.82 1.304 The Internet should not be used to purchase vehicles. 1400 1 5 3.10 1.387 Valid N (listwise) 1400         Question 3.

Indication of opinion about the market. Descriptive Statistics   N Minimum Maximum Sum Mean Variance I don't like to hassle with car salesmen. 1400 1 5 4764 3.40 2.625 I like the process of buying a new vehicle. 1400 1 5 2557 1.83 1.389 The Internet should not be used to purchase vehicles. 1400 1 5 4346 3.10 1.925 Online dealerships are just another way of getting you into the traditional dealership. 1400 1 5 2971 2.12 1.025 I think purchasing items from the Internet is safe. 1400 1 5 3942 2.82 1.696 I like using the Internet. 1400 1 5 3955 2.82 1.596 I use the Internet to research purchases I make. 1400 1 5 4350 3.11 1.600 The Internet is a good tool to use when researching an automobile purchase. 1400 1 5 3941 2.82 1.599 Valid N (listwise) 1400           Question 4.

How many times before you purchased the automobile did you visit the auto online web site? Visiting the web site before making purchase.   N Minimum Maximum Mean Std. Deviation Variance About how many times before you bought your automobile did you visit the Auto Online web site? 1400 1 16 6.61 3.171 10.054 Valid N (listwise) 1400           Question 5. How did you find about the website? How did find about the website?   N Minimum Maximum Mean Std. Deviation Variance Found out about Auto Online from a friend 1400 0 1 . 06 . 234 . 055 Found out about Auto Online from a billboard 1400 0 1 . 03 . 180 . 032 Found out about Auto Online from an Internet banner 1400 0 1 . 17 . 375 . 141 Found out about Auto Online by Web surfing 1400 0 1 . 43 . 496 . 246 Found out about Auto Online from a search engine 1400 0 1 . 66 . 473 . 223 The web site was easy to use. 1400 1 5 3.81 1.397 1.952 Valid N (listwise) 1400           Question 6.

Personal opinion about online website. Personal opinion   N Minimum Maximum Mean Std. Deviation Variance I found the web site was very helpful in my purchase. 1400 1 5 3.48 1.097 1.203 I had a positive experience using the web site. 1400 1 5 3.27 1.025 1.050 I would use this web site only for research. 1400 1 5 2.14 1.217 1.480 The web site influenced me to buy my vehicle 1400 2 5 3.99 . 657 . 432 I would feel secure to buy from this web site. 1400 1 5 4.36 . 716 . 512 The web site was easy to use. 1400 1 5 3.81 1.397 1.952 Valid N (listwise) 1400           Question 7. Did you purchase your automobile from the website? Did you purchase your automobile from the website?   N Minimum Maximum Mean Std. Deviation Variance Did you buy your new vehicle on the Auto Online web site? 1400 1 2 1.79 . 404 . 163 If yes, was it a better experience than buying at a traditional dealership visit? 287 1 2 1.05 . 223 . 050 If yes, indicate how much better. 272 1 4 1.97 1.007 1.014 Valid N (listwise) 272           Question 8.

Personal opinion about purchases. Descriptive Statistics about purchases   N Minimum Maximum Sum Mean Std. Deviation Variance People feel that the Internet is not a safe place for personal information. 1400 1 5 4534 3.24 1.487 2.212 People want to test the performance of the vehicle before buying it. 1400 2 5 6299 4.50 . 668 . 446 People feel they can negotiate a better price by talking with a sales representative in person. 1400 1 5 3962 2.83 1.661 2.759 People usually have trade-ins that are too complicated to deal with online. 1400 1 5 4396 3.14 1.631 2.659 People like to have a "hands on" situation when buying different options for their vehicle. 1400 1 5 5605 4.00 1.052 1.107 People want to see the vehicle before they buy it to check for imperfections. 1400 1 5 2391 1.71 . 982 . 965 Valid N (listwise) 1400             Question 9.

How long did you search for the automobile on the website? Descriptive Statistics showing during the purchase.   N Minimum Maximum Sum Mean Std. Deviation Variance For how many weeks were you actively searching for your vehicle? 1400 1 12 5050 3.61 2.351 5.528 Valid N (listwise) 1400             Question 10. The cost the vehicle. Descriptive Statistics showing cost of vehicles   N Minimum Maximum Sum Mean Std. Deviation Variance If you traded in a vehicle, approximately how much was it worth? 1296 $1,000 $31,000 $13,450,000 $10,378.09 $5,331.392 28423735.640 Valid N (listwise) 1296             Question 11. The approximate cost of sticker. Descriptive Statistics showing cost of stickers   N Minimum Maximum Sum Mean Std.

Deviation Variance What was the approximate sticker price of your new vehicle? 1400 $10,000 $35,000 $21,695,000 $15,496.43 $4,905.977 24068607.679 Valid N (listwise) 1400             Question 12. Approximate actual prices. Descriptive Statistics showing the approximate actual cost   N Range Minimum Maximum Mean Std. Deviation Variance What was the approximate actual price you paid for it? 1400 $28,000 $5,000 $33,000 $13,181.43 $5,017.903 25179354.641 Valid N (listwise) 1400             Question 13. What is your age? Descriptive Statistics showing respondents age   N Range Minimum Maximum Mean Std. Deviation Variance What is your age? 1400 45 21 66 36.08 8.625 74.399 Valid N (listwise) 1400             Question 14. Marital status Descriptive Statistics of marital status   N Range Minimum Maximum Mean Std. Deviation Variance What is your marital status? 1400 4 1 5 2.00 1.135 1.289 Valid N (listwise) 1400              

References

Bush, B. a. (2010). Marketing Research. New York: Upper Saddle River.

Salkind, G. a. (2008). Using SPSS for Windows and Macintosh. New York: Upper Saddle River.

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