Essays on Attitudes/experiences of international students Statistics Project

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Lecturer’s and Number Submitted Attitude/Experiences of International This paper attempts to investigatethe aspects of lifestyle, attitude, and experiences of the international students using statistical provisions. Method Participants The participants for the survey included the students, their friends, family members, and coworkers. Out of the participants, for the first survey (Survey A), 438 people were approached, but 345 agreed to participate in the survey. However, for the second survey (Survey B), only 265 people were approached but 240 people agreed to participate. Procedure The first step involved identification of the participants and a questionnaire, with the executed variables for the topic of study exclusively integrated.

As described above, 585 participants were recruited for purposes of survey A and survey B. Qualitative and quantitative design was adopted as a formal, objective, systematic process to describe and test relationships and examine cause and effect interactions among variables. Descriptive surveys being used for descriptive, explanatory, and exploratory research design was used to collect original data from a sample of participants by means of self-report, that is, the people respond to a series of questions in the questionnaire. The key variables of interest for the study included; gender, period of study, age, nature of study, international student or not, course, employment, personality, attitude, life satisfaction, stress mindset, performance, and goal orientation.

The variables were aimed at capturing the demographic data, personality, and performance data of the students, especially the international students. Measures Survey A was aimed at capturing the students attitudes with a 15-item questionnaire aimed at gathering the general information about the participants. The subjects in questions were gender, period of study, age, nature of study, international student or not, course, employment, personality, attitude, life satisfaction, stress mindset, performance, and goal orientation. Survey B was aimed at capturing the employee workplace information.

With a 11-item questionnaire, Survey B aimed at gathering information on tenure, industry, size of the company, job satisfaction, attitude towards supervisor, and attitude towards current job (turnover). Result Descriptive Statistics According to table I, 2, 3, and 4, (Apendix1), the descriptive statistics shows that out of the most of the international students, 57.4% are female students, while 42.6% are male students (Appendix 4). From the data, 83.8% of the students are studying full time while 11.3% study part time (appendix 2).

83.2% of the international students major in JMSB, 4.6% in A&S, 2.6% in ENCS, 1.2% in FA, while 7% major in others (appendix 3). The mean age for the international students is 22 years and the mean study hours per week are 12.0496 hours (appendix 1). Hypothesis Hypothesis 1: There is a negative relationship between being an international student and studying long hours and full time studies. By analyzing or comparing means using a two-way ANOVA test, the F-ratios for the status and studying hours are 4.619 and 3.036 respectively (appendix 9).

In this case, if the null hypothesis is true, the F ratio is likely to be close to 1.0. If the null hypothesis is not true, the F- ratio is likely to be greater than 1.0. Considering the ANOVA result, the null hypothesis is rejected. Thus, the statement that there is a positive link between being an international student and studying long hours as well as taking full time study status is true. Most of the international students study long hours and take full time studies. Hypothesis 2: Most of the international students have negative attitude towards their supervisors at workplaces The p-value for positive attitude and negative attitude are 0.081 and 0.008 respectively while their significance levels are 0.138 and 0.132 respectively (appendix 7).

This suggests that as some students have negative attitude, others have positive attitude for their supervisors at workplace. Thus, the hypothesis is rejected, as the p-value is less than their significance levels. Hypothesis 3: Most of international students are not satisfied with their current jobs According to appendix 8, the p-value for job satisfaction is -0.043 at significance level of 0.505.

The p-value is less than the significance level, meaning that hypothesis is rejected. While most of the international students are not satisfied with the current jobs, a few are satisfied. Works Cited Appendixes Appendix 1 Descriptive Statistics N Minimum Maximum Mean Std. Deviation Variance International 341 1.00 2.00 1.8211 . 38382 . 147 Study Hrs. 342 . 00 50.00 14.1959 9.05852 82.057 Gender 345 1.00 2.00 1.5739 . 49522 . 245 Age 345 2.00 47.00 22.4609 3.31563 10.993 Work Hrs. 343 . 00 50.00 12.0496 12.09890 146.384 Terms 337 . 00 15.00 4.7092 2.38921 5.708 Status 328 1.00 2.00 1.1189 . 32417 . 105 Major 340 1.00 5.00 1.4176 1.10335 1.217 Valid N (listwise) 306 Appendix 2 Status Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative Percent Valid 1.00 289 83.8 88.1 88.1 2.00 39 11.3 11.9 100.0 Total 328 95.1 100.0 Missing System 17 4.9 Total 345 100.0 Appendix 3 Major Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative Percent Valid 1.00 287 83.2 84.4 84.4 2.00 16 4.6 4.7 89.1 3.00 9 2.6 2.6 91.8 4.00 4 1.2 1.2 92.9 5.00 24 7.0 7.1 100.0 Total 340 98.6 100.0 Missing System 5 1.4 Total 345 100.0 Appendix 4 Gender Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative Percent Valid 1.00 147 42.6 42.6 42.6 2.00 198 57.4 57.4 100.0 Total 345 100.0 100.0 Appendix 5 Independent Samples Test Levenes Test for Equality of Variances t-test for Equality of Means F Sig. t df Sig. (2-tailed) Mean Difference Std. Error Difference 95% Confidence Interval of the Difference Lower Upper Status Equal variances assumed 23.218 . 000 -2.149 322 . 032 -. 10235 . 04762 -. 19603 -. 00866 Equal variances not assumed -3.126 145.931 . 002 -. 10235 . 03274 -. 16705 -. 03764 StudyHrs Equal variances assumed. 092 . 762 1.750 336 . 081 2.24724 1.28434 -. 27913 4.77361 Equal variances not assumed 1.672 82.567 . 098 2.24724 1.34433 -. 42679 4.92128 appendix 6 Correlations International WorkHrs Status International Pearson Correlation 1 . 304**. 119* Sig.

(2-tailed). 000 . 032 N 341 339 324 WorkHrs Pearson Correlation. 304** 1 . 246** Sig. (2-tailed). 000 . 000 N 339 343 326 Status Pearson Correlation. 119*. 246** 1 Sig. (2-tailed). 032 . 000 N 324 326 328 **. Correlation is significant at the 0.01 level (2-tailed). *. Correlation is significant at the 0.05 level (2-tailed). Appendix 7 Correlations International PA3 NA4 International Pearson Correlation 1 . 081 -. 082 Sig. (2-tailed). 138 . 132 N 341 339 339 PA3 Pearson Correlation. 081 1 . 008 Sig. (2-tailed). 138 . 883 N 339 343 342 NA4 Pearson Correlation -. 082 . 008 1 Sig. (2-tailed). 132 . 883 N 339 342 343 Appendix 8 Correlations JOBSAT1 STRESS1 JOBSAT1 Pearson Correlation 1 -. 043 Sig. (2-tailed). 505 N 240 240 STRESS1 Pearson Correlation -. 043 1 Sig. (2-tailed). 505 N 240 240 Appendix 9 ANOVA Sum of Squares df Mean Square F Sig. Status Between Groups. 485 1 . 485 4.619 . 032 Within Groups 33.820 322 . 105 Total 34.306 323 StudyHrs Between Groups 249.218 1 249.218 3.062 . 081 Within Groups 27351.548 336 81.403 Total 27600.766 337

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