Essays on Methods in Which Factors Contributing to Drinking of Alcohol Can Be Determined Research Proposal

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The paper "Methods in Which Factors Contributing to Drinking of Alcohol Can Be Determined" is a perfect example of a business research proposal.   This paper presents a research proposal on methods in which factors contributing to the drinking of alcohol can be determined. This involves the identification of a number of theories related to the drinking of alcohol and the impacts of economic, psychological and social factors in contributing to alcoholism among the population of Australia. Other issues that are investigated include biological factors where the main areas of focus include the contribution resulting from genetic factors, the explanations provided by the disease theory, the explanation of the psychological theory and harmful effects of excessive alcohol consumption.

The main economic factors influencing alcohol consumption that are investigated include price and the level of taxation, marketing and promotion, accessibility and availability. The aim of conducting a study on these factors is because it has been found that they are the main contributing factors to excessive consumption of alcohol in Australia. This is because the government of Australia had observed that there was increased consumption of alcohol which impacted on the population in terms of the health of the people and allocation of resources in the areas of fighting over-consumption of alcohol (Acton, 2013).

Consequently, an investigation is carried out on the impacts of alcohol consumption on the health of the population of Australia. The main impacts that are targeted include physical impacts such as the emergence of diseases, economic impacts such as overspending and psychological impacts such as inability to live peacefully among the Australia population. The results of the study of these impacts will be significant in establishing methods of controlling the effects of diseases, financial loss and lack of co-existence among the population of Australia.

The knowledge required to complete this report includes figures showing current alcohol consumption rates in Australia such as the amount of alcohol consumed, the brands of alcohol consumed by the population and the driving factors towards consumption of alcohol (Blaxter, Hughes & Tight, 2001). This enables the identification of methods that can be used to control the rate at which alcohol is consumed by controlling the driving factors.

This is followed by the provision of a number of recommendations aimed at controlling excessive consumption of Alcohol and thus reducing impacts on health, economic status and social welfare of the population of Australia. These recommendations are intended to be used by the government of Australia as the basis on which excessive consumption will be controlled within its population (Grinyer 2002). In addition, this paper provides a number of challenges experienced by the government of Australia in the process of controlling the consumption of alcohol or controlling the distribution of alcohol in the country.

This information will be significant in determining ways in which these challenges can be controlled so that success is achieved in the process of controlling alcohol consumption among the population of Australia. Research questions This research proposal aims at finding answers to the following research questions: Which factors contribute to excessive alcohol consumption in Australia? Which steps have been taken to control excessive alcohol consumption in Australia? Which demographic groups are most affected by alcohol consumption in Australia? What are the challenges experienced by the government of Australia in the effort to control excessive alcohol consumption?

References

7. References

Acton, Q (2013). Issues in Addiction and Eating Disorders: 2013 Edition. Scholarly Editions.

Blaxter L., Hughes C., & Tight M. (2001) 2nd edition. How to research. Chapter 6: 153-191.

Buckingham: Open University Press.

Grinyer A. (2002) The Anonymity of Research Participants: Assumptions, Ethics and

Practicalities. Social Research Update: Issue 36. University of Surrey.

Government of Western Australia (2012/2013).Drug and Alcohol Office Annual Report

2012/2013.Retrieved 24th August 2014.

McDonald, D (2012). The Extent and Nature of Alcohol, Tobacco and Other Drug Use, and

Related Harms in the Australian Capital Territory, Edition 4. Wamboin: Social Research

&Evaluation Pty Ltd. Retrieved 21st August 2014.

National Alliance for Action on Alcohol (NAAA, 2012).Reducing Harm from Alcohol: Creating

a Healthier Australia. Retrieved 21st August 2014.

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