Essays on Market Characteristics of Four Seasons Hotels and Resorts Case Study

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The paper "Market Characteristics of Four Seasons Hotels and Resorts" is an outstanding example of a marketing case study. What does the luxury hotel industry mean? How has its growth been? What are the trends as depicted by the recent reports on the luxury hotel industry? What has been the place of Four Seasons Hotels and Resorts in the luxury hotel segment? What are the values that have driven the company, and what can be future trends in the segment? What are market segmentation and marketing mix and what do they achieve?

What is the global size of the international tourism market, what is its volume? Plus what is the government’ s intervention in the tourism industry as a whole? This paper discusses all this and more. Introduction On account of the scarcity of data, it is not easy to measure the global size of this industry. However, four years ago, the UN World Tourism Organization (UNWTO) data were used to ascertain the enormity of this industry in the "international Hotel Industry" report (2009), Mintel. The report estimated a total number of hotel rooms at around 20.1 million, where the growth in the years preceding 2008 was around 2.2 percent.

Of all these rooms, Europe comprised of 36 percent, Americas 35 percent, Asia Pacific 24 percent, Middle East 2 percent, and Africa 2 percent. This UNWTO figure referred to rooms as those in inns, small hotels, and other small establishments, apart from well-established hotels that are either popular in the domestic or international market. As a result of this, a figure of 20.1 million was considered to be somewhat overestimated. When the statistics were narrowed down to bigger and better hotels only, this figure was put at 11 million rooms which, by the industry norms, was no less a feat that the industry has accomplished.

International tourist arrivals were estimated at 980 million and that was despite Tsunami in Japan and political disturbances in North Africa and the Middle East. The growth in international tourist arrivals in the year of the Tsunami was 4 percent. Keeping this rate of growth in view, these arrivals were estimated to cross the 1 billion mark by the end of 2012.

References

The paper "Market Characteristics of Four Seasons Hotels and Resorts" is an outstanding example of a marketing case study. What does the luxury hotel industry mean? How has its growth been? What are the trends as depicted by the recent reports on the luxury hotel industry? What has been the place of Four Seasons Hotels and Resorts in the luxury hotel segment? What are the values that have driven the company, and what can be future trends in the segment? What are market segmentation and marketing mix and what do they achieve? What is the global size of the international tourism market, what is its volume? Plus what is the government’s intervention in the tourism industry as a whole? This paper discusses all this and more.

Introduction

On account of the scarcity of data, it is not easy to measure the global size of this industry. However, four years ago, the UN World Tourism Organization (UNWTO) data were used to ascertain the enormity of this industry in the "international Hotel Industry" report (2009), Mintel. The report estimated a total number of hotel rooms at around 20.1 million, where the growth in the years preceding 2008 was around 2.2 percent. Of all these rooms, Europe comprised of 36 percent, Americas 35 percent, Asia Pacific 24 percent, Middle East 2 percent, and Africa 2 percent. This UNWTO figure referred to rooms as those in inns, small hotels, and other small establishments, apart from well-established hotels that are either popular in the domestic or international market. As a result of this, a figure of 20.1 million was considered to be somewhat overestimated. When the statistics were narrowed down to bigger and better hotels only, this figure was put at 11 million rooms which, by the industry norms, was no less a feat that the industry has accomplished. International tourist arrivals were estimated at 980 million and that was despite Tsunami in Japan and political disturbances in North Africa and the Middle East.

The growth in international tourist arrivals in the year of the Tsunami was 4 percent. Keeping this rate of growth in view, these arrivals were estimated to cross the 1 billion marks by the end of 2012.

Download full paperFile format: .doc, available for editing
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