Essays on Role of CSR Communication in Enhancing the Organization Products in the Competitive Market Coursework

Download full paperFile format: .doc, available for editing

The paper "Role of CSR Communication in Enhancing Organization Products in the Competitive Market" is a great example of marketing coursework. Communication is the key to the success of any organization in a competitive market. Communication assists an organization in creating product awareness in the market, sending messages regarding its promotion process among other things. Corporate communication is basically meant to advance the company’ s position in the market. The purpose of this report is to evaluate how ALID Company can communicate its CSR activities with the intention of benefiting the company economically.

In this case, the report focuses on CSR communication role in the promotion of the ALDI’ s product sales and hence increasing its market share. Theory CSR Corporate social responsibility (CSR) is used to define strategies firms or corporations use to run their businesses in society friendly, ethical and community benefits with regard to development. CSR can comprise of a number of activities that include involvement in sustainability and environmental conservation activities, developing associations with customers, employees, an investment that is socially sensitive, and working in association with local communities which can all be useful for the development of ALDI Company (Ismail, 2009). Utilitarian Theory CSR is governed by three theories which include relational, managerial and utilitarian.

According to utilitarian theories, ALDI will serve as a section of the economic system with mechanical function. The ideas of CSR according to this theory emerged after the acknowledgement that there is a requirement for responsibility economics, integrated with the corporation business ethics. Therefore, the traditional business laissez-faire makes way to a personal obligation to social responsibility, individualism to public management and determinism. Therefore, utilitarian theories of the CSR are associated with the ALDI competitive advantages strategies and thus, its application will enhance the development of higher competitive ability. Managerial theory The managerial theory stresses on corporate management whereby CSR are advanced internally by the corporation.

In this case, everything external to ALDI will be considered during the firm’ s decision-making process. Thus, this theory is categorized into three sub-classes that include multinationals social responsibility, social accountability, auditing and reporting (SAAR), and corporate social performance (CSP). CSP focuses on measuring the social variable contribution to the performance of the economy.

SAAR is associated with the contribution of social performance via reporting, auditing and accounting procedure, and thus, giving the company a chance to be accountable for its actions. ALDI is a multinational company and according to this aspect of CSP managerial theory, this company CSR will grow due to global challenges and competition it will or has experienced at international level. This managerial theory aspect was introduced as a result of the managers’ responsibility for defining essential tools regarding MNCs CSR to survive in foreign nations (Secchi, 2007). Relational Theory The relational theory contains its root on the complex relationships of the firm and the environment.

The CSR, in this case, focuses on the association between the environment and the firm for the CSR analysis. A relational theory of CSR is divided further into four subsections which include social contract, corporate citizenship, stakeholder approach and society and business. Society and business are suggested to imply business in a society where CSR emerges as a result of interaction between the two units (Van Marrewijk, 2003). The ALDI Company can employ stakeholder technique to enhance the firm’ s management.

Corporate citizenship is also used as the route the company adopt to behave responsibly. Social contact, on the other hand, addresses the important issues justifying economic activities morality so as to have a theoretical foundation for evaluating social associations between the society and corporation (Ismail, 2009).

References

Alsop, R. J. (2005). Communicating corporate citizenship. Leading Perspectives, Summer, 4–5.

Belasen, A. T. (2008). The theory and practice of corporate communication. Sage Publication Inc.

Cornelissen, J. (2011). Corporate communication: A guide to theory and practice. Sage Publication, Inc.

Dawkins, J. (2004). Corporate responsibility: the communication challenge. Journal of Communication Challenge, 9, 108–119.

Du, S., Bhattacharya, C. B., & Sen, S. (2010). Maximizing business returns to corporate social responsibility (CSR): The role of CSR communication. International Journal of Management Reviews, 8-19. DOI: 10.1111/j.1468-2370.2009.00276.x

Freeman, R. E., & Phillips, R. A. (2002). Stakeholder theory: A libertarian defense. Business Ethics Quarterly, 12(3), 331-349.

Garriga, E, &. Mele, D. (2004). Corporate social responsibility theories: Mapping and territory. Journal of Business Ethics, 53, 51-74.

Ismail, M. (2009). Corporate social responsibility and its role in community development: an international perspective. The Journal of International Social Research, 2(9), 199-209

Kotler, P., & Lee, N. (2005). Corporate social responsibility: doing the most good for your company and your cause. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley.

Lee, M. P. (2008). Review of the theories of corporate social responsibility: Its evolutionary path and the road ahead. International Journal of Management Reviews, 10(1), 53-73.

Maignan, I.,
&
Ferrell,
O.
C.
(2004).
Corporate
social
responsibility
and
marketing:
An
 integrative
framework.
Journal
of
the
Academy
of
Marketing
Science,
32(1),
3‐19.


Matten,D.,
Moon,
J.
(2008).
"Implicit"
and
"explicit"
CSR:
A
conceptual
framework
for
a comparative
understanding
of
corporate
social
responsibility.
Academy
of
 Management
Review,
33(2),
404‐424.


Morsing, M. (2006). Corporate social responsibility as strategic auto-communication: on the role of external stakeholders for member identification. Business Ethics: A European Review, 15(2), 175-182.

Secchi, D. (2007). Utilitarian, managerial and relational theories of corporate social responsibility. International Journal of Management Reviews, 9(4), 347-373.

Sagepub. (2010). Defining corporate communication. Chapter 1. Retrieved from < http://www.sagepub.com/upm-data/39352_978_0_85702_243_1.pdf >

Sen,
S.,
&
Bhattacharya,
C.
B.
(2001).
Does
doing
good
always
lead
to
doing
better?
 consumer
reactions
to
corporate
social
responsibility.
Journal
of
Marketing
 Research
(JMR),
38(2),
225‐243.

Simmons,C.
J.,
&
Becker‐Olsen,
K.
L.
(2006).
Achieving
Marketing
Objectives
Through
Social
 Sponsorships.
Journal
of
Marketing,
70(4),
154‐169.

Schwartz, M. S., & Carroll, A. B. 2003. Corporate social responsibility: a three-domain approach. Business Ethics Quarterly, 13(4), 503–530

Van Marrewijk, M. (2003). Concept and definitions of CSR and corporate sustainability: between agency and communion. Journal of Business Ethics, 44, 95–105

Yoon,
Y.,
Gürhan‐Canli,
Z.,
&
Schwarz,
N.
(2006).
The
effect
of
corporate
social
 responsibility
(csr)
activities
on
companies
with
bad
reputations.
Journal
of
 Consumer
Psychology,
16(4),
377‐390.

Download full paperFile format: .doc, available for editing
Contact Us