Essays on The Role of Australian Trade Unions in the Education of Workers, the Key Role of Labor Education in Strengthening the Trade Unions Literature review

Download full paperFile format: .doc, available for editing

The paper “ The Role of Australian Trade Unions in the Education of Workers, the Key Role of Labor Education in Strengthening the Trade Unions” is a spectacular variant of literature review on human resources.   The article "Exploring the role of Australian trade unions in the education of workers" was written by Yaskawa, Brown, and Black from the University of Technology, Sydney. Its purpose is to analyze two main elements. First is the current literacy and numeracy crisis in workplaces in Australia which is characterized by loss of productivity, lack of penetration of education and training programs, and shortages of skills, which are being blamed on workers’ lack of numeracy and literacy skills.

The second element is the opportunity for unions to show their stake in training and education of workers. The authors seek to establish the possibilities that exist to achieve this and the extant models from which Australia can draw. The article is basically a research paper premised on the state of union education and training in Australia. The main theme of the paper is that Australian workplaces face a numeracy and literacy crisis.

That is, many Australian workers have achieved low levels of education and training and this directly impacts their numeracy and literacy levels. The authors cite various authorities to support this position, including the Council of Australian Governments (COAG) (2008), the Australian Industry Group (2010), and Skills Australia (2010). This citing of numerous sources of literature is clear evidence that the authors conducted adequate research to obtain facts about the issue at hand. Other sources supporting this information include a 2006 Adult Literacy and Life Skills Survey (ALLS) and data from the Australian Bureau of Statistics (2008).

Indeed, lack of literacy and numeracy skills is a matter that has been of concern to other bodies such as Innovation & Business Skills Australia (2010), which notes that Australia’ s workforce lacks the foundation skills of language, literacy, and numeracy. The status quo no doubt affects various issues such as the formation of labor unions, active participation in the same, and education and training. The article by Yasukawa, Brown, and Black (2011) is therefore comprehensive as it identifies a key problem facing the Australian workforce and attempts to offer a solution by showing how unions can be involved in training and education of workers.

No gap is evident in the auricle since the article touches on the challenges that unions are likely to face with respect to education and training. The article by Yasukawa, Brown, and Black (2011) seems to be balanced in terms of the perspectives under focus. There is no dominant voice but a balanced review of issues concerning union education based on different sources of literature. It is based on these reviews and case studies that the authors come up with suggestions on how unions can play an active role in impacting literacy and numeracy policy debates so as to create spaces for numeracy and literacy that develops social capital which in turn is important for developing human capital as well.

In short, the authors identify particular problems, assess different perspectives of the problems in literature, and attempt to solve these problems based on the literature and case studies that they review. Hence, this all-round approach ensures that no significant issues are marginalized with respect to the topic in question.

Ideally, the work starts by identifying the problems that affect the Australian workforce in regard to their education and training and this helps in identifying the challenges in union training and education.

Download full paperFile format: .doc, available for editing
Contact Us