Essays on Data-Driven Marketing Assignment

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The paper "Data-Driven Marketing" is a great example of a Marketing Assignment. A detailed basic analysis has been performed to evaluate the performance of the initial campaign for the toys. First, we have generated the descriptive for all the four customers with loyalty statuses based on whether they used the voucher or not and which loyalty group customers used the vouchers maximum. The results of the SPSS are shown in table 1 below: Descriptive Statistics Customer loyalty status (in order): Tin, Silver, Gold, or Platinum N Minimum Maximum Mean Std. Deviation Gold Used the voucher or not? (data collected after the campaign) Valid N (listwise) 544 544 0   1   . 20   . 399   Platinum Used the voucher or not?

(data collected after the campaign) Valid N (listwise) 77 77 0   1   . 16   . 365   Silver Used the voucher or not? (data collected after the campaign) Valid N (listwise) 695 695 0   1   . 26   . 439   Tin Used the voucher or not? (data collected after the campaign) 528 0 1 . 28 . 450   Valid N (listwise) 528         Table 1: Descriptive Statistics for RESPONSE If we look at the mean ratings of all the four loyalty groups, then it could be seen that the Tin loyalty group customers which are the lowest level of the loyalty program have used the vouchers most of the time. A total o 528 Tin loyal customers have made use of the vouchers when buying toys for their children.

The least mean score is for the Platinum loyalty group. Therefore, it can be said that the campaign did not have an impact on the loyalties of the customers and the customers used their vouchers irrespective of their loyalty status. After this, we have generated the descriptive of the affluence score of the four loyalty groups. The SPSS results ate shown in table 2 below: Statistics Affluence grade on a scale from 1 to 30 Gold N   Mean Median Std. Deviation Minimum Maximum Valid Missing 8.68 8.00 3.413 1 24 544 0 Platinum N   Mean Median Std. Deviation Minimum Maximum Valid Missing 8.65 9.00 3.194 2 21 77 0 Silver N   Mean Median Std. Deviation Minimum Maximum Valid Missing 8.77 8.00 3.582 2 30 695 0 Tin N   Mean Median Std. Deviation Minimum Valid Missing 8.86 9.00 3.381 2 528 0   Maximum 27 Table 2: Descriptive of AFFLUENCE GRADE If we look at the above statistics, then we can see that the Silver loyalty group has the highest mean affluence score among all the four customers.

The maximum affluence score is of the Silver group which is 30. It shows that loyalty status does not correspond to the affluence score of the customers. The frequency of the affluence score for the Silver groups is shown in chart 1 below: Chart 1: Affluence Score Frequency for Silver After this, we have determined which loyalty group has generated the highest profit after the campaign and whether it is the same group that has used the most vouchers after the campaign.

The results of the descriptive of the profit are shown in table 3 below: Descriptive Statistics Customer loyalty status (in order): Tin, Silver, Gold, or Platinum N Minimum Maximum Mean Std. Deviation Gold Total profit from the transaction (using the voucher) Valid N (listwise) 544 544 . 00   99.00   9.9057   23.00390   Platinum Total profit from the transaction (using the voucher) Valid N (listwise) 77 77 . 00   51.00   4.3175   10.61439   Silver Total profit from the transaction (using the voucher) Valid N (listwise) 695 695 . 00   100.00   10.5607   23.06490   Tin Total profit from the transaction (using the voucher) 528 . 00 100.00 5.1831 12.12765   Valid N (listwise) 528         Table 3: Descriptive of PROFIT If we look at the results of SPSS as shown in table 3 above then we can see that the highest profit has been generated by the Silver group which also had the highest mean number of the affluence score.

However, the highest vouchers had been used by the Tin group, therefore, it is clear that the Silver group has generated the highest mean voucher of $10.56 per transaction. The number of Tin customers is lower than Silver customers which might be the reason for this high profitability but there is also a small difference in the mean score of whether the group used the voucher or not. We can conclude on this basis that a number of vouchers and affluence scores both have an impact on the profitability of the campaign.

In the end, we have used correlations between the customer loyalty status, profit and whether the voucher had been used or not. The correlation between RESPONSE and PROFIT is 77.2% which is significant at 0.05 for the Silver group. Other groups also have a significant relationship with RESPONSE as shown in exhibit 1 in appendices.

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