Essays on Employee Engagement in London Case Study

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The paper 'Employee Engagement in London" is a good example of a management case study. William Khan defines employee engagement as harnessing of institute colleagues' personalities to their labor role parts; in engagement, individuals work and express themselves in the flesh, cognitively, and mentally throughout role performances. Psychological conditions involved in employee engagement include psychological meaningfulness, psychological availability and psychological safety. According to a report done by Gallup in 2012 on the state of the global Workplace; employee engagement insights for business leaders worldwide. , employee engagement is rare with only 13% of employees in the world engaged at their place of work.

The study by Gallup was done in 140 countries and showed that New Zealand and Australia have the uppermost levels of employee engagement with up to 23% and 24% of employees involved in employee engagement respectively. These figures were however small compared to the ones in the United States of America that had up to 30% of its employees engaged at work (Fletcher & Robinson, 2013). This paper seeks to critically evaluate the implementation strategy for employee engagement at the London Ambulance Service NHS Trust using Kahn’ s 1990 model of employee engagement.

The paper also seeks to provide justified recommendations on how the London Ambulance Service NHS Trust can improve employee engagement in the future (Admasachew & Dawson, 2011). Psychological safety The London ambulance service has included the health and well-being strategy for its employees to ensure that there is employee engagement. The strategy for personal safety implemented by the London Ambulance Service has extensive significance with engagement. To ensure the personal safety of its employees, the London Ambulance Service has introduced LINC, made sure that the employees who work on the front line wear stab vests and it has introduced a trauma counseling service (Halliday et al, 2013).

Khan, 1990 defines safety in his model as a sense of being able to show and employ self without fear of negative consequence to self-image, status or career. It goes further to associate personal safety with elements of public systems that generate more or less non-threatening, foreseeable and constant social circumstances by which to engage. By implementing the strategy on personal safety, the London Ambulance Service, therefore, ensures that they have shaped how their employees inhabit their roles. The Changes to working practices that have been introduced by the ambulance service NHS Trust that is as a result of the partnerships with the trade unions do not include a psychological safety element in terms of maintaining the organizational norms.

The partnership has improved on the deployment of the staff and it has introduced new working hours that have helped the organization meet the demand for its service. The partnership has however not considered the fact that by doing so it is not putting the element of psychological safety in terms of the organizational norms of its employees into consideration.

The partnership is instead distorting the shared expectations of the employees about the general behaviors of system members (Khan, 1990). According to Khan, 1990, employees that stay within a normal way of behaving and working feel secure than those who go out of the protective boundary. This could be a potential source of disappointment and unease especially for employees with less influence, as deviancy is in many social systems.

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