Essays on Should the State Take Part in Employment Relations Literature review

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The paper “ Should the State Take Part in Employment Relations? ” is an impressive example of the literature review on human resources. Work is essential to the human condition. It determines what individuals do daily. Work enables individuals to relate with other people and assists in defining a sense of identity. It also enables individuals to enjoy the material necessities of life and achievements of civilizations. Therefore, the way work is allocated, organized, managed, and rewarded is essential to individuals in society. The allocation, organization, management, and rewarding of work simply refer to employment relations.

Employment relations dwell a lot on the relationship between employees and their employers within the workplace. This, therefore, has raised concerns on whether the state should take no part in employment relations and leave it entirely to employers and their employees. This paper evaluates this statement with reference to the modern Australian workplace. The state should take no part in employment relations. It should entirely leave it to employers and their employees. It can be argued that the state should take no part in employment relations since it is always biased in its operations.

It is believed that the state’ s business in the economic system affects its regulatory role in the employment relation system. There is always a tendency of the state to find ways of protecting private set-up, whose main objective is profit maximization. The state does always come up with an excuse for developing a favorable climate that will attract more investors and create more jobs. This, however, is not always the case, since it usually provides priority to the probable benefits in terms of revenue that will be accumulated to its covers.

The state earns revenue from either employers’ profits or employees via taxes. However, it normally protects employers more than employees. The bias of the state occurs when it provides concession to employers through the reduction of taxes, customs duties, provision of the minimum wage, and hindering employees from asking a lot from investors (Gennard, 2005).

References

Gennard, J. & Judge, G, 2005, Employee Relations. CIPD Publishing

Marchington, M & Wilkinson, A, 2005, Human Resource Management at Work: People Management and Development. CIPD Publishing

Peetz, D, 2006, Brave new workplace: how individual contracts are changing our jobs, x, 262 p.

Teicher, et al, 2006, Employee relations management: Australia in a global context, Pearson Education Australia, 2nd ed

The Office of The Commission For Public employment (TOTCFPE), 2012, AN OVERVIEW OF THE NATIONAL INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS SYSTEM AND THE ROLE OF THE OFFICE OF THE COMMISSIONER FOR PUBLIC EMPLOYMENT.

Todd T. 2007, Foundations of Industrial Relations. University of Western Australia, Crawley

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