Essays on Employment Relations in Non-union Firms Assignment

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The paper 'Employment Relations in Non-union Firms' is a great example of a Business Assignment. One commonality can be seen in terms of the point that members of both the design department and the assembly department of LIPC Integration Plc. are not satisfied with the performance-related pay and reward system that is being implemented by the organization. Thus, the views of members of the two departments are not shared by their employers. However, the reasons why the two departments are opposed to the performance-related pay and reward system are different. On one hand, the design department is dissatisfied with the pay system because the members believe that their work is more involving and thus they should be paid more for their talent and creativity.

On the other hand, the members of the assembly department are opposed to the performance-related pay system because they have not seen any change in their pay due to the nature of their job, which is clearly planned and rigidly designed that nothing can be done to improve their productivity. The scenarios above show the similarities and differences between the pluralist and radical approaches to the relationship between an employer and employees.

The design department (pluralist) seems to be view conflict as inevitable as argued by Edwards (2003, p. 11). By taking a pluralist approach, groups participate in determining the rules of employment and they have their own bases of authority (Edwards 2003, p. 11). From the case study, it can be seen that the design department is trying to define how the members should be paid and who should own the intellectual property rights of the work that they produce.

On the other hand, the assembly department (radical) seems to take the approach that the members should be able to control the means of production and the means that support it as noted by Combe (2014, p. 270). For instance, members of the assembly department want more flexible work hours, numerous short coffee breaks, and higher pay since they see no other way that their work can be improved so that they can increase their productivity and thus benefit optimally from the performance-related pay and reward system. There are clear differences between the pluralist and radical approaches to employee-employer relationships and the unitarist approach.

In the case study, the design department and the assembly department are opposed to the performance-related pay and reward system. But the fabrication department, which can be said to have taken the unitarist approach, has welcomed the system. A unitary view is whereby there is an identity of interest between employees and their employer (Edwards 2003, p. 10). The view of the fabrication department is that the performance-related pay and reward system has inspired some members of this department to work longer hours, to be more attentive, and to be more dedicated to their tasks.

Thus, in both the fabrication department’ s and the professional assessors’ view, the level of production has increased because of the performance-related pay and reward system. The only thing that employees in the fabrication department want from their employer is training, which the employer has considered to offer. On the other hand, LIPC Integration Plc. is hesitant to give in to the demands of the design department and the assembly department and is considering hiring people in the design department as consultants and outsourcing the services of the assembly department.

References

Combe, C 2014, Introduction to management, Oxford University Press, Oxford.

Cooney, R & Stuart, M 2012, ‘Introduction: trade union in vocational education and training in theory and practice’, in R Cooney & M Stuart (eds), Trade unions and workplace training: issues and international perspectives, Routledge, Abingdon, Oxon, pp. 1-22.

Cowling, A 2013, ‘Developing a strategy for human resources’, in A Cowling & C Mailer (eds), Managing human resources, 3rd edn, Routledge, London, pp. 5-20.

Dinitzen, HB & Jensen, LK 2010, Organisational theory, Hans Reitzels Forlag, Cipenhagen.

Dundon, T & Rollinson, D 2004, Employment relations in non-union firms, Routledge, London.

Edwards, P 2003, ‘The employment relationship and the field of industrial relations’, in P Edwards (ed.), Industrial relations: theory and practice in Britain, Blackwell Publishing, Oxford, pp. 1-36.

Kelemen, M L & Rumens, N 2008, An introduction to critical management research, SAGE Publications, London.

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