Essays on The Overall Management Strategy in John Lewis Company Case Study

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The paper "The Overall Management Strategy in John Lewis Company" is a brilliant example of a case study on management. John Lewis partnership exists as one of the few United Kingdom Companies where over the few years it has proved hat bumper bonuses do not necessarily provoke a public outcry. The partnership structure was established by a prolific business person named John Spedan Lewis, whom the father is believed to have founded the entire business in the year 1864. John Spedan Lewis signed away the company’ s ownership to allow for coming generations of employees to continue with his work of experimenting with industrial democracy.

John Spedan’ s ideas are set out in the company’ s legal constitution which consists of an idea of establishing a better form of business (PLC, and Knowledge, 2016). About 76,500 of John Lewis’ s permanent working staff are partners who ultimately own 272 Waitrose supermarkets and 35 department stores which are estimated to generate revenue of around £ 8bn. In the constitution, John Lewis’ s lists a formal mission aimed at maximizing the happiness of the working staff responsible for perfecting business activities.

John Lewis Partnership Company remains to be a visionary organization that puts the happiness of the workers at the center of every business operation that the company undertakes. The form of leadership exhibited by the corporation as a whole is also transformational which has aided in the achievement of its goals and objectives. Introduction The partnership structure was established by a prolific business person named John Spedan Lewis, whom the father is believed to have founded the entire business in the year 1864. John Lewis’ s structure combines the aspect of business expertise in its operations with a legally mandated commitment to ethical structures, cultural involvement, employee transparency, and co-ownership.

The company’ s structure is a good illustration of a trust mechanism that consists of an intricate set of organs with separate roles of business management and democratic representation linked together at the divisional level (divisional councils) and apex level (chairperson role and partnership board).  

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