Essays on Customers of Friendly Market Issues Case Study

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The paper "Customers of Friendly Market Issues" is a great example of a Marketing Case Study. Market surveys usually target a selected sample of the population. This is because sampling is more convenient, reliable and less costly. However, in order to carry out a given survey effectively, proper preparation should be done. These may include the design and preparation of survey questionnaires, identification of the target population, clear identification of the sampling frame to be used and carrying out other logistical evaluations that will ensure a successful survey. In this case study, the associations between the demographic and lifestyle characteristics of the 162 respondents were related to the customers of the friendly market and Circle K. Q1.

Descriptive Statistics Table 1: Summary of the classification of the respective variables and the appropriate statistics related to such variables Variable name Scale Statistics FRIENDLY Nominal Frequencies, Percentages CIRCLE Nominal Frequencies, Percentages DWELL Nominal Frequencies, Percentages SEX Nominal Frequencies, Percentages WORK Nominal Frequencies, Percentages COMMUTE Nominal Frequencies, Percentages BARGAIN Nominal Frequencies, Percentages CASH Nominal Frequencies, Percentages QUICK Nominal Frequencies, Percentages KNOW ME Nominal Frequencies, Percentages HURRY Nominal Frequencies, Percentages Table 2: Frequency statistics for the variables included in the sampling frame Use Friendly Market Frequency Percent Valid Do not use Regularly 90 55.6   Use Regularly 72 44.4   Total 162 100.0 Use Circle K Frequency Percent Valid Do not use Regularly 39 24.1   Use Regularly 123 75.9   Total 162 100.0 Type of Dwelling Frequency Percent Valid Own Home 29 17.9   Rent 133 82.1   Total 162 100.0 Respondent's Sex Frequency Percent Valid Male 76 46.9   Female 86 53.1   Total 162 100.0 Work Status Frequency Percent Valid Full time 88 54.3   Part-time 45 27.8   Retired/ Do Not Work 29 17.9   Total 162 100.0 Pass by Friendly Market & Circle K? Frequency Percent Valid No 25 15.4   Yes 108 66.7   Total 133 82.1 Missing System 29 17.9   Total 162 100.0 Look for bargains Frequency Percent Valid Disagree 4 2.5   Neither Agree Nor Disagree 35 21.6   Agree 123 75.9   Total 162 100.0 Always pay cash Frequency Percent Valid Disagree 25 15.4   Neither Agree Nor Disagree 101 62.3   Agree 36 22.2   Total 162 100.0 Like quick, easy shopping Frequency Percent Valid Disagree 20 12.3   Neither Agree Nor Disagree 100 61.7   Agree 42 25.9   Total 162 100.0 Shop where they know me Frequency Percent Valid Disagree 45 27.8   Neither Agree Nor Disagree 44 27.2   Agree 73 45.1   Total 162 100.0 Always in a hurry Frequency Percent Valid Disagree 68 42.0   Neither Agree Nor Disagree 80 49.4   Agree 14 8.6   Total 162 100.0 Q2.Do Friendly Market and Circle K have the same customers? Table 3: Summary of Cross-tabulation frequencies and percentages Use Friendly Market Use Circle K Do Not Use Regularly Total Use Regularly Use Friendly Market Do not use Regularly Count 13 77 90     % within Use Friendly Market 14.4% 85.6%     Use Regularly Count 26 46 72     % within Use Friendly Market 36.1% 63.9%     Total   39 123 162 To evaluate whether the friendly market and Circle K have the same customers, formulate a null hypothesis that states that the Friendly market and Circle K do not have the same customers and test it against the alternative hypothesis, at a significance level of 5%. The chi-square test showed that there is a significant association between the customers of the friendly market and Circle K.

χ 2(1) = 10.273, p  = . 001. Therefore, at alpha level of significance. 05, reject the null hypothesis. Hence, the Friendly market and Circle K have the same customers. As indicated in Table 3, 14.4% of the respondents who do not use regularly the Friend market also do not use regularly the Circle K, while 63.9% of the respondents who use regularly the Friend market also use regularly Circle K. Q3.

What is the demographic profile associated with Friendly Market’ s customers? Table 4: Cross-tabulation frequencies and percentages Demographic Variable Patronage of Friendly Market Do Not Use Regularly Dwelling     Own 82.8% 17.2% Rent 49.6% 50.4% To evaluate the demographic profile associated with customers of friendly market; formulate a null hypothesis which states that there is no association between the customers of Friendly market and the type of dwelling. Subsequently, test the null hypothesis against an alternative hypothesis, at significance level of 5%. The chi-square test showed that there is a significant association between the customers of Friendly market and type of dwelling.

The Pearson chi-square, χ 2(1) = 10.586, p  = . 001, therefore, at alpha level of significance. 05, reject the null hypothesis. Hence, there is a significant association, between the type of dwelling and the customers of Friendly market. 82.8% of the respondents who own homes do not use regularly the Friend market regularly with only 17.2% of the homeowners estimated to be using the friendly market regularly. On the other hand, 50.4% of those who rent their homes use the friendly market regularly while 49.6% of the respondents, who are tenants, do not use friendly market regularly. Q4.

What is the demographic profile associated with Circle K’ s customers? Table 5: Cross-tabulation frequencies and percentages Demographic Variable Patronage of Circle K Do Not Use Regularly Dwelling     Own 27.6% 72.4% Rent 23.3% 76.7% To evaluate the demographic profile that is associated with Circle K’ s customers; formulate a null hypothesis which states that there is no association between the customers of Circle K and the type of dwelling. Subsequently, test the null hypothesis against an alternative hypothesis, at significance level of 5%.

The chi-square test showed that there is no significant association between the customers of Circle K market and type of dwelling. The Pearson chi-square, χ 2(1) = . 238, p  = . 625, therefore, at alpha level of significance. 05, accept the null hypothesis. Table 5 shows the association between Friendly market customers and lifestyle. To evaluate the nature of the association between the respective variables; formulate a null hypothesis for the respective lifestyle variables which states that there is no association between the customers of Friendly Market and the lifestyle variable.

Subsequently, test the null hypotheses against alternative hypotheses, at a significance level of 5%. As indicated in Table 7, the only significant association at a 5% level of significance is between the lifestyle variable ‘ shopping where they know me’ and the Friendly market. The Pearson chi-square, χ 2(2) = 59.296, p  = . 000, for the hypothesis test relating to lifestyle variable ‘ shopping where they know me’ and Friendly market. Hence, at the alpha level of significance. 05, reject the null hypothesis which states that there is no association between customers shopping where they are known and Friendly Market and concludes that there is indeed significant association between lifestyle variable ‘ shopping where they know me’ and Friendly market. The sample used in the survey can be said to be reliable.

This is because the sampling frame consists of a substantially large sample size of 162 respondents. Therefore, the information collected from the survey is reliable to be used in decision making. Based on the findings of the survey, there is a significant association between the customers of the friendly market and Circle K. This implies that the Friendly market and Circle K have the same customers. In addition, as established from the test of the hypothesis, there is a significant association between the customers of the Friendly market and the type of dwelling with the majority of the customers who use a friendly market regularly renting their homes.

Furthermore, statistical data analysis also established that the majority of customers who prefer to shop where they are known to use Friendly Market regularly.

References

List

Green, S. B., & Salkind, N. J 2008, Using SPSS for Window and Macintosh: Analyzing and Understanding data (5th ed.), Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Prentice Hall.

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