Essays on Public Administration Challenges That Lead to Failure of the Government Coursework

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The paper "Public Administration Challenges That Lead to Failure of the Government " is a great example of management coursework. Any government has the responsibility of making sure that the wellbeing of its citizens is guaranteed. Citizens expect their government to have a strong social and economic foundation necessary for delivering the necessary services. There are public administrators who are responsible for delivering the necessary public services such as education and health care services among others. The quality of the services offered in public administration is what determines the satisfaction of the citizens.

Citizens collectively contribute towards the funding of the public services through taxation hence they expect the government to provide the appropriate services. The government has the objective of improving national productivity by ensuring the provision of the necessary services to the citizens (Howard, 2008). However, public administration has been facing numerous challenges that lead to the failure of the government to provide the necessary services to its citizens. The Australian government has been working towards improving its competitiveness at the international level. This has been possible through enhancing political accountability, independence, and flexibility.

The flexibility aspect of the government is crucial in the process of making sure that the necessary adjustments are done to cope with the changes taking place globally. Political accountability is vital in ensuring that there is effectiveness in the use of public funds (AGRAGA, 2010). This essay is exploring the commonwealth government in the new federalism to provide the necessary interventions and forms of public management to assist the government in achieving the set objectives. Responsibilities and roles of commonwealth government in new federalism The commonwealth government has the responsibility of providing the necessary public services like education and health.

The support provided by the commonwealth government to the citizens is primarily based on the needs of the people where their interests are paramount. The necessary measures are put in place to ensure that there are evaluations to assess the efficiency of the support being provided. For instance, commonwealth exerts influence over the providers of education services to ensure accountability in the use of public funds. The primary aim of the commonwealth government is to enhance productivity by ensuring political accountability.

It is through the political accountability that the funds allocated can be used for the intended purpose. The commonwealth government ensures that the relevant stakeholders are engaged in the process of developing the fund allocation model (Brown and Bellamy, 2007). The engagement of the stakeholders is crucial in the process of ensuring that the funds are allocated according to the needs of the people and that appropriate amount of funds are allocated. The commonwealth government also has the role of making sure that there is efficiency in the use of the funds allocated.

Besides, it has the responsibility of making sure that the citizens are provided with the essential services in a way that is transparent and open to promoting accountability. However, there is a continued misuse of the funds in the provision of the services as the public administrators who are responsible for safeguarding the public funds are not accountable. For instance, currently, the commonwealth raises around 80% of the revenue but it is responsible for around 60% of the expenditure (Twomey and Withers, 2007). This is a clear indication that there is a need for improvement in the accountability in the use of the public funds hence commonwealth has the role of making sure that it is accountable for the money spent.

References

Brown, A.J. and Bellamy, J. eds (2007), Federalism and Regionalism in Australia: New Approaches, New Institutions, Canberra, ANU E Press.

Brown, A.J. (2004), ‘One Continent, Two Federalisms: Rediscovering the Original Meanings of the Australian Federal Political Ideas’, Australian Journal of Public Administration, 39, 4, pp. 485-504.

CIE (2012), Impacts of Commonwealth public sector job cuts on the ACT, report prepared for Select Committee on Estimates 2012-13 ACT Legislative Assembly, Centre for International Economics, Canberra and Sydney.

Gallop, G. (2011), How Healthy is Australian Federalism? Papers on Parliament, No. 56, July, Canberra, Parliament of Australia.

Hollander, R. and Patapan, H. (2007), ‘Pragmatic Federalism: Australian Federalism from Hawke to Howard’, Australian Journal of Political Science, 42, 2.

Howard, J. (2008), Address to the Millennium Forum, Four Seasons Hotel, Sydney, 20 August 2007. See: http://pmtranscripts.dpmc.gov.au/preview.php?did=15309

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http://www.australianreview.net/digest/2007/election/wilkins.html (accessed 5 February 2015).

National Commission of Audit (2015), Reforming the Federation, available on-line at: http://www.ncoa.gov.au/report/appendix-vol-1/8-reforming-federation.html.

Silver, H. (2010), ‘Getting the best out of federalism—the role of the Productivity Commission and the limits of national approaches’, Australian Journal of Public Administration, vol. 69, no. 3, p. 327.

Public Policy Brief (2014), Competitive Federalism. Available on-line at:

http://www.cmaxadvisory.com/public-policy-briefs/competitive-federalism (accessed 5 February 2015).

Reform of Australian Government Administration (AGRAGA) (2010) Ahead of the Game: Advisory Group on the Reform of Australian Government Administration, Canberra: Commonwealth of Australia. *

Twomey, A. and Withers, G. (2007), Australia’s Federal Future: Delivering Growth and Prosperity, a report for the Council for the Australian Federation.

Available on-line at: http://www.caf.gov.au/Documents/AustraliasFederalFuture.pdf (accessed 17 December 2014).

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