Essays on Individual Decision Making Framework versus Group Decision Making Framework - Honda Company Case Study

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The paper "Individual Decision Making Framework versus Group Decision Making Framework - Honda Company " is a great example of a management case study. This report seeks to analyze the sociological perspective of an individual decision-making framework for the Honda Company that saw it become the leading motorcycle company in the American market. Generally, the main reasons attributed to the expansion and success of Honda was based on the market share loss, profitability declines as well as scale economy disadvantage in technology, distribution and manufacturing (Pascale, 1996) with Honda coming up with an effective strategy to maximize their profits. .. The Honda Strategy was to be a low-cost producer of motorcycles and exploit the economies of scale in utilizing its market position in Japan to force entry into the US market with a description of it being a ‘ leisure’ class.

In highlighting the sociological perspective in terms of how the Honda Company makes decisions one would say that it was a two people affair, rising to a group of executives from its formative years. One would say this was to improve the way it managed its affairs in different markets and opening up a better business opportunity.

The opening of a new company in the United States was crucial and a need to have new executives with a vision to manage the company. The recommendations for the continued success of the Honda Company can only be said to involve having and adopting a broad system of business and management strategy. The role of other employees needs to be taken into account by the entire company because more ideas would be gathered as well as dealing with the possibility of having and experiencing the Abilene Paradox.

A consensus approach in the decision-making process with a focus on the descriptive action-research model would be the best to be adopted by the company. 1. INTRODUCTION The main aim and purpose of this report are to analyze the decision-making framework of the Honda Company which in 1982 had at least six Japanese executives responsible for their ultimate position of dominance in the U. S market. The instrumental support that was provided by the executives was based on them being inventive and geniuses in the motorcycle business.

The embracing of competitive markets as well as a good marketing strategy was amongst the key objectives that have led to the success of Honda Japanese Company, in the United States of America. The decision making framework from 1959 to 1982 seemed to be the same with a group of top executives to implement the company decisions as well as adopt them. The report will analyze the two significant issues of the company both at the individual and group levels of the company. By the year 1982, the Company had already had about six executives, bringing in different expertise to the company as well as decisions for implementation for the company.

The consensus passed by all of them in terms of key areas of the business was crucial in determining its success within the United States market. The Honda decision making strategy basically revolved around their inability to focus on the perceptions of the American people on motorcycles. Prior to them establishing the American Honda Motor Company in 1959, there was already a limited market for motorcycles in the whole of America.

They perceived them to be for rowdy people, groups and for troublesome teenagers

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