Essays on The UKs Emergency Planning Arrangements Case Study

Download full paperFile format: .doc, available for editing

The paper 'The UK’ s Emergency Planning Arrangements" is a good example of a management case study. The management system of emergency of the United Kingdom (UK) has gone through considerable changes and reforms from the Second World War with the fundamental aim of reducing human casualties (Cabinet Office, 2009e). The available historical data from the past decades illustrates the rising frequency as well as the threat of leading disasters like biological, technological, chemical, environmental, manmade, social, or natural incidents that affect the UK. The potential of experiencing threats in addition to devastating outcomes following the terrorist attacks on 9/11 together with the London bombings in 2005 increase the question concerning the UK’ s readiness to successfully handle mass casualties and large disasters.

The paper explores the effectiveness of the UK’ s emergency planning arrangements with regards to the background that the UK’ s emergency planning arrangements are fundamentally flawed due to the failure to make government departments category one responders. The position of the government category 1 and 2 The UK is a state that is unitary comprising of 4 countries namely Northern Ireland, Wales, Scotland, and England (Cabinet Office, 2009e).

The state is governed by the system of parliamentary, whose capital is situated in London. The Civil Contingencies Act (CCA), as well as accompanying non-legislative standards, delivers a solitary framework for the UK’ s civil protection (Cabinet Office, 2009a). The Act’ s first part and statutory guidance and supporting Regulations in emergency preparedness set up a clear category of responsibilities and roles for the people involved in preparations and response of emergency at the local division. The Act separates local responders in two categories, which imposes different categories of roles on each.

The ones in the first category are organizations that are at the centre of the response to various emergencies (the local authorities, NHS bodies, emergency services). Responders in category 1 are dependent on the full category of duties of civil protection. Their duties may include and not limited to: assessing the emergencies’ risk happening and apply this to notify contingency planning; setting emergency plans; sharing information with different local responders so as to promote co-ordination; work together with various local responders to promote efficiency and co-ordination; and providing assistance and advice to voluntary organizations and businesses concerning continuity management of the business (only local authorities) (Cabinet Office, 2009c).

Reference

Cabinet Office, 2013, Emergency response and recovery, Retrieved from Cabinet Office UK: https://www.gov.uk/emergency-response-and-recovery

Cabinet Office, 2005, Central Government Arrangements for Responding to an Emergency, Retrieved from Cabinet Office UK: http://www.cabinetoffice.gov.uk/media/132685/conops.pdf

Cabinet Office, 2009a, Civil Contingencies Act, Retrieved from Cabinet Office: http://www.cabinetoffice.gov.uk/ukresilience/preparedness/ccact.aspx#part2

Cabinet Office, 2009b, List of Lead Government Departments' Responsibilities, Retrieved from Cabinet Office: http://www.cabinetoffice.gov.uk/ukresilience/response/ukgovernment/responsibilities.aspx

Cabinet Office, 2009c, Management and Co-ordination of Local Operations, Retrieved from Cabinet Office: http://www.cabinetoffice.gov.uk/ukresilience/response/localoperations.aspx

Cabinet Office, 2009d, Management and co-ordination of local operations, Retrieved April from Cabinet Office: http://www.cabinetoffice.gov.uk/media/132053/err_chap_03.pdf

Cabinet Office, 2008, The Role of Lead Government Departments in Planning for and Managing Crises, Retrieved from Cabinet Office: http://www.cabinetoffice.gov.uk/media/132847/lgds_framework.pdf

Cabinet Office, 2009e, UK Government, Retrieved from Cabinet Office: http://www.cabinetoffice.gov.uk/ukresilience/response/ukgovernment.aspx

Civil Contingencies Secretariat, 2009b, Introduction to the Civil Contingencies Secretariat, Retrieved from Cabinet Office: http://www.cabinetoffice.gov.uk/ukresilience/ccs.aspx

Civil Contingencies Secretariat, 2009a, The Lead Government Department and its role – Guidance and Best Practice, Retrieved from Cabinet Office: http://www.cabinetoffice.gov.uk/media/132844/lgds.pdf

Sahin, B, Kapucu, N, & Unlu, A 2008, Perspectives on Crisis Management in European Union Countries: United Kingdom, Spain and Germany, European Journal of Economic and Political Studies , 1 (1), 19-45.

Download full paperFile format: .doc, available for editing
Contact Us