Essays on What Is At The Interest Of The Strong Or Ruler Coursework

Socrates View of Justice Lecturer: Justice is closely linked with being fair to other people. Socrates was mostly concerned that injustices were carried out with impunity by the leadership. Specifically, he was concerned that individuals be judged according to the law and regulations that had been laid out. Justice was not meant to be carried out by the desires of the leaders. In the clip, he offers an apology when he was as a member of the Council that was addressing the trial of the body of ten generals who had failed to collect the survivors of the sea battle. He opposed the rest of the committee’s decision of acting against the law. He was not afraid to face death or a prison sentence.
Socrates views a government that acts in defiance of its set laws as an unjust government. He also identifies the actions of people who wish to break the laws as injustice. In addition, he argues that it is better to suffer from acts of injustice than to be the cause. He further states that suffering injustice can only cause physical injuries, but it does not hurt one’s character. Doing injustice to others is detrimental to one’s conscience and character (Plato, Grube, & Cooper,65)
Socrates places emphasis on negative justice that is not carrying acts of injustice to others. He was not concerned with positive justice that can be defined as seeing that other people get what they rightfully deserve.
He identified the need to adhere to set laws especially in times of political turbulence and emergencies. Further, he stressed the importance of avoiding tempting shortcuts to violate liberties and punish wrongdoers without observing their rights. He advised that the due process of law should be followed.
References
Plato, Grube, G. M. A., & Cooper, J. M. (2000). The trial and death of Socrates: Euthyphro, Apology, Crito, death scene from Phaedo. Indianapolis, IN: Hackett Pub.

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