Essays on Stress in the Workplace Report

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The paper "Stress in the Workplace " is an outstanding example of a management report.   The incidence of work-related stress (or occupational stress) is on the rise in Australia with nearly two-thirds of employees reporting extreme stress at work. Stress hinders the job performance of many employees due to burnout. This study seeks to investigate whether the experience of stress varies due to occupational characteristics and whether different individuals experience different levels of stress due to individual demographics such as age, gender and personality. The study was conducted using two questionnaire interviews held with respondents who experience different levels of occupational stress- a kindergarten teacher in a public school and a dental hygienist working as an assistant to a dentist in a private clinic.

The results of the study support the hypothesis that occupational stress has been correlated with occupational characteristics and individual demographics indicating those employees’ experiences of stress vary across occupations and demographic characteristics such as age, gender and personality Stress in the Workplace The incidence of work-related stress (or occupational stress) is on the rise in Australia with nearly two-thirds of employees reporting extreme stress at work (McShane and Travaglione 2005).

This trend has negatively affected organizational productivity since among many other effects, work-related stress leads to severe physical and psychological consequences such as burnout, fatigue, depression, anxiety, frustration and in extreme cases suicidal intent (Caulfield et al 2004). Stress hinders the job performance of many employees and there is an increasing need to develop and implement interventions aimed at mitigating the negative effects of work-related stress in organizations (Narayan et al 1999). This study aims to examine how occupational stress varies across different occupations in Australia. From a theoretical perspective, occupational stress has been correlated with occupational characteristics and individual demographics indicating that employees’ experiences of stress vary across occupations and demographic characteristics such as age, gender and personality.

References

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Caulfield, N., Chang, D., Dollard, M., & Elshaug, C. (2004). A review of occupational stress interventions in Australia. International Journal of Stress Management 11(2): 149 –166.

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McShane, S., and Travaglione, T., (2005). Organizational Behaviour on the Rim. Boston: Irwin McGraw Hill.

Narayan, L. Menon, S. & Spector, P.E. (1999). Stress in the Workplace: A Comparison of Gender and Occupations. Journal of Organizational Behaviour 20(1): 63-73.

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