Essays on Business Analysis of Increase in Flipped Learning at Griffith University Case Study

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The paper "Business Analysis of Increase in Flipped Learning at Griffith University" is a perfect example of a business case study. The purpose of this report is to carry out business analysis of Griffith University’ s hypothetical aim to increase the use of “ flipped learning. The identified problem is the lack of sufficient technology for all students, which is necessary for flipped learning because not all students have computers and are able to access the internet at home. The adopted perspective is student engagement which is likely to increase with the increased use of flipped learning.

The identified stakeholders included the school dean, vice-chancellor, end-user, lecturers, project manager, head of finance, faculties, university departments, IT managers among others and each stakeholder has a role through their significance differs in the project. To identify the key stakeholders, an influence-interest matrix was used. The level of influence and importance of every stakeholder was determined. In addition, the level of interest was established by how the decisions or the success of the project affects each stakeholder. The problem was analyzed through brainstorming where the problem was discussed through discussions and also through interviews.

SWOT analysis was used to analyze flipped learning into areas of strength, opportunities, weaknesses as well as threats. Introduction This report presents a business analysis of an increase in “ flipped learning” at Griffith University. The identified problem is the lack of sufficient technology for all students, which is necessary for flipped learning because not all students have computers and are able to access the internet at home. Student engagement is the perspective adopted in the report since student engagement is perceived as an indicator of successful classroom instruction as well as an outcome of school improvement activities and hence this perspective will indicate if flipped learning is a success or not (Schlecty, 2010).

References

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Dumont, R. (2005). Mission and Place: Strengthening Learning and CommunityThrough Campus Design. Oryx/Greenwood.

Schlecty, P. (2010). "Increasing Student Engagement.missouri: Missouri Leadership Academy.

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McNaughton, T. (2010). Technology commercialisation and universities in Canada. In OECD (Ed.) Entrepreneurship and higher education. Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development.

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