Essays on Resignation of Mathew Rennalls from Caribbean Bauxite Company Case Study

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The paper "Resignation of Mathew Rennalls from Caribbean Bauxite Company" is an outstanding example of a business case study. A promising new local leader left in a huff of resentment due to a misunderstanding of the motives of his superior. The report will examine the different personality profiles of the players in question as well as their leadership and communication styles in an effort to discover what the underlying causes for the misunderstanding that ensued were. The conclusion aims to point out what could have been done differently in order to get a different result. Introduction This case study is an account of the interaction of two individuals; John Baker and Mathew Rennalls.

The former is the chief engineer of a Mining Corporation while the latter is his deputy who is taking over from him, as he is promoted to a new destination. The two conduct a final interview that is supposed to act as a handing over of the position from one to the other. John Baker is concerned about Mathew Rennalls oversensitivity to racial overtones. He feels that Mathew harbours a bias against expatriates because of his experience at a London University.

Mathew however, does not admit to any such bias and insists that he looks upon all employees the same. John Baker attempts to get him to reveal his sensitivity in a bid to help him overcome it, by making a comment that is tailored to nudge a reaction from him. Unfortunately for the corporation, Mathew does not react immediately but goes home to mull things over, decides that he and his compatriots have been severely insulted and as a result, tenders his resignation while threatening to have the whole corporation deported for racism. Key Issues The key issues that have emerged from this excerpt include the different personality profiles that are apparent.

The way that John Baker chooses to handle the issue and the way that Mathew Rennalls react are products of their personality. Their interpretation of each others’ words and actions leads to the conflict that occurs. This leads to the next key issue which are the personality traits that have led them to this point. While they possess a similar sense of humour, they still interpret each others’ words differently.

John Baker perceives that in spite of their warm relationship, Mathew Rennalls still keeps him at a distance because of his ethnicity. While Mathew Rennalls is under the impression that he is being open and friendly. This could be as a result of a conflict of cultures between Baker and Rennalls. This could stem from the different perceptions their cultural backgrounds confer upon them. The differences in perceptions can be a product of Leadership style. The differing ideas about a leaders’ role and how they should interact with subordinates may also be a product of perception. My report will be concerned with the main issues that are the personality profiles of these two individuals that are influenced by the cultural conflict which has led to different perceptions of leadership style.

This is the background of the breakdown of their relationship and will lead to a greater understanding of the same.

References

Ayman, R. (1993). Leadership perception: The role of gender and culture. In M.M. Chemers & R. Ayman (Eds.), Leadership theory and research (pp. 137-166). San Diego: Academic Press.

Benfara, R and J. Knox (1991). Understanding Your Management Style. Lexington, MASS: Lexington Books.

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Hofstede, G. (1993). Cultural constraints in management theories. Academy of Management Executive, 7(l), 81-94.

Smith, P.B., & Peterson, M.F. (1988). Leadership, organizations, and culture: An event management model. Beverly Hills, CA: Sage.

Stogdill, R. (1974) Handbook of Leadership (1st Ed.). New York: Free Press.

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