Essays on Human Resource Management's Structure Choices Versus Market Structure Case Study

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The paper "Human Resource Management's Structure Choices Versus Market Structure" is a perfect example of a Management Case Study. The key aim of this report is to examine whether Human Resource Managers (HRM) have a strategic choice given that Human Resource Management depends on strategic management and strategic management depends on markets. In addition to this, it will provide four recommendations on how Human Resource Management can align itself with strategic management by reflecting on HRM’ S administrative, one-way, two-way and integrative linkage. Scope- This report will focus on examining HRM’ s structure choices versus market structure.

It will also provide recommendations on how HRM can align itself with strategic management. Methodology- The findings of this study will be based on the critical review of relevant literature such as books, journals, and articles. Findings - To some extent, strategic choices can be determined by market structures and strategies adapted can also influence structures. However, it is possible for HRM to make strategic choices that are not necessarily influenced by market structures (Saias & Hall, 1980). Recommendations – The report recommends that HRM can align itself with strategic management by going beyond its administrative duties and expanding into the organization’ s strategy. This report seeks to examine whether Human Resource Managers (HRM) have a strategic choice given that Human Resource Management depends on strategic management and strategic management depends on markets.

In addition to this, it will provide four recommendations on how Human Resource Management can align itself with strategic management by reflecting on HRM’ S administrative, one-way, two-way and integrative linkage. Over the years researchers have shown increased interest in examining the relationship between the structures and the strategy of organizations.

For most researchers, there is a close link between structure, strategy, and environment that businesses or organizations operate in (Saias & Hall, 1980). According to Hyman (1987), market structures determine the strategic choices made by management. Based on Hyman’ s sentiments, it is worth questioning whether Human Resource Managers can have a strategic choice when Human Resource Management depends on strategic management and strategic management depends on the markets. Conversely, Chandler (1962) argues that structure follows strategy. Saias & Hall (1980), further note that whereas organizations may build the structure of an organization, in practice it is these structures that later on constraint the strategic choices that the management of organizations make. HRM and strategic choices Hyman’ s sentiments that market structures determine the strategic choices made by management raise questions on whether Human Resource Managers can have a strategic choice when Human Resource Management depends on strategic management and strategic management depends on the markets.

Basically, Hyman implies that market structures are what influence the strategic choices made by Human Resource Managers. To some extent Hyman’ s sentiments are plausible. Hyman’ s sentiments are typified in how modern-day organizations operate.

Over time, most organizations have realigned their strategic goals and practices in order to respond to the pressure in the markets and so as to effectively maintain their competitive edge in the market. A good example is McDonald’ s Corporation. The McDonald’ s corporation is a multinational company that specializes in the provision of fast food products. The company has for a long time been the world’ s largest restaurant and fast-food chain with restaurants in over 100 countries (Vignali 2001). The strategic choices made by the company are often dependent on market structures.

Given the fact that the company operates in various parts of the world, the company has been forced to strategically adapt to market structures of local regions so as to maintain its competitive edge in the global market. For instance, in some countries, the company has changed its product line and remodeled its retail space so as to appeal to the local market. Similarly, McDonald’ s HRM practices and strategic choices are influenced by market structures. As a multinational company, the company has to comply with regulations and policies of the local regions that it operates in.

The company also has to align its strategic choices to the market structures of the local regions that it operates in. As a result, much of the company’ s strategic choices are influenced by market structures (Daft 2005; Han 2008). This validates Hyman’ s sentiments that market structures determine the strategic choices made by management (Hyman 1987).

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