Essays on The Government Has Changed Immigration Requirements for Skilled Labour Coursework

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The paper 'The Government Has Changed Immigration Requirements for Skilled Labour" is a good example of business coursework.   The “ Letter to the Editor” is frantically sending the message that Queensland is seriously in need of skilled workers. Arguing that the economic boom in Queensland that is fuelled by the mining industry is expectedly not going to last long, the owner of the medium-sized manufacturing company communicates his/her need for skilled workers – welders, tradespeople, electricians, and technicians – NOW! Otherwise, his/her company cannot capitalize on the present economic growth in the region.   In the letter, the businessman briefly touches on two possibilities of dealing with the shortage of skilled workers.

He/she is emphatically in opposition against the plan of the government to skill up the country’ s present pool of workers. According to him, it would not solve the problem of shortage of skilled workers while it would need a major commitment of funds by federal and state governments.   As he/she suggested, bringing in skilled workers from outside of Australia is going to work more effectively. He/she is, of course, not blind to the problems that go with his proposal – such as that in the past skilled workers were confined just in the metropolitan centers, the foreign workers particularly those from Southeast Asia and Oceania had been exploited against by their Australian employers, and that there is in Australia a movement against multiculturalism (resulting to racial discrimination) to the detriment of the foreign workers who are integrating themselves into the Australian society.

However, the letter-writer posits that, when foreign skilled workers are brought in, the business would move on.   At the outset, let it be clear that the position of the businessman is simplistic and, hence, not completely tenable.

It is because he/she thinks that buying skill and skilling up are two disconnected choices or alternatives insofar as improvement of human capital is concerned; and, so, he/she can opt for one OR the other. But, without preempting the later presentation, the way to improve the quality of any organization’ s – or any nation’ s – human capital would include bringing in new blood AND improving what is already at hand. Equally, the businessman’ s idea is one-dimensional in the sense that he seems to forget that the government makes the decision not in a vacuum, but within particular contexts. The whole picture   Skill is a measure of a laborer’ s expertise and capacity to carry out pre-determined results with the minimum outlay of time, energy, or both.

Skilled workers – such as the masons, brewers, carpenters, welders, blacksmiths, technicians, bakers, coopers, printers, electricians, among others – are those who are generally more trained, higher-paid, and given more responsibilities than their unskilled counterparts. As stated in the letter, the relative demand for skilled labor in the rural area of Queensland is occasioned by the current economic boost resulting from the strong mining activities in the area.

Such a condition requires human capital. At the same time, the relative supply of skilled worker in the region is determined by the factor of immigration – at least, insofar as it’ s seen by the letter-writer.

References

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Department of Immigration and Citizenship. 2009. Visa, immigration and refugees. [Online]. Available at: http://www.immi.gov.au/skilled/ [Accessed 14 December 2009].

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Rouda, R.H. & Kusy, M., 1995. Beyond training: a perspective on improving organizations and people. Tappi Journal, [Online]. Available at: http://www.unitar.org/hiroshima/sites/default/files/22.AF09.OW_.Background_reading_Part1.pdf [Accessed 15 December 2009].

Rudd, K. et al., 2007. Skilling Australia for the future: election 2007 policy document. Available at: http://www.mskills.com.au/DownloadManager/Downloads/ALP%20Skills%20policy.pdf [Accessed 14 December 2009].

Smith, A., 2009. Australia needs more skilled workers, no more uni graduates. [Online]. Available at: http://www.smh.com.au/opinion/society-and-culture/australia-needs-skilled-workers-not-more-uni-graduates-20091110-i7i7.html [Accessed 14 December 2009].

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