Essays on Why Are Operational Plans Used by a Business Assignment

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The paper 'Why Are Operational Plans Used by a Business" is a perfect example of a business assignment. Assure that accomplishments are well documented. Operational planning is a complicated process that requires the dedication of everyone involved. Its success can only be measured by the people that it affects. common problems that occur with operational planning that were identified while researching multiple plans.   • Loss of potential leaders due to agency structure; • Lack of an objective selection process; • Command staff need to be accountable for the operational plan; • Lack of communication to potential leaders; • Lack of participation from all levels of management.

By frequently updating, reviewing, and modifying the plan, problems can be 2) What is the process for planning, implementing and reviewing an operational plan? In the past 10 years or so, attention has also focused on investigating the success factors of many of the operational planning efforts. Success depends on a wide range of issues; these include organizational issues (Lederer & Sethi, 1991), resource issues (Tukana & Weber, 1996), the effectiveness of the planning methods used and the actual relevance of the plan, and more importantly, problems associated with implementing the plans themselves (Tukana & Weber, 1996).

While executives have to set the direction for the business, it is equally important to listen to the views of the people in the field and at the shop floor level who are close to the business. They can provide valuable input such as fresh ideas, feedback on the performance of existing systems, as well as gaps in information systems. These inputs are invaluable in making better prioritisation decisions. Such user participation (Feurer et al. , 2000) and consultation with employees can also create a sense of belonging and empowerment. However, listening alone is not good enough; there is also a need to communicate clearly to all levels how technology can significantly improve business performance.

Lack of communication (Teo & Ang, 2001) can result in serious resistance from employees to the implementation of a strategic plan and the accompanying changes. Also listening and communication should not be restricted to internal employees. It should include all stakeholders of the organization— suppliers, customers, distributors, and so on. This means creating an organizational culture that proactively supports constructive engagement and information sharing between all levels of the organization and its external stakeholders.

The plan should be high-level enough to allow changes in implementation details without rewriting the whole document. One sensible approach is limiting the number of pages the plan can contain and then using subdocuments to deal with implementation and other details— too much detail can often put people off. Another approach is to divide the strategic plan into two sections: one describing applications or solutions for business units or functions and the other providing information on infrastructure requirements, software upgrades, and so on (Slater, 2002).

By doing so, representatives from other departments can focus on solutions and not the architecture, if they choose. 3) How can you ensure that the intended user group is aware of and participates in a plan's implementation? Two aspects of plan implementation included the external focus on clients and an internal focus on business operations, both are vital to quality processes (Reed and Lemak 1996). Internal business operations depend on employees who develop quality products and services and gather customer requirements.

The plan should be high-level enough to allow changes in implementation details without rewriting the whole document. One sensible approach is limiting the number of pages the plan can contain and then using subdocuments to deal with implementation and other details— too much detail can often put people off. Another approach is to divide the strategic plan into two sections: one describing applications or solutions for business units or functions and the other providing information on infrastructure requirements, software upgrades, and so on (Slater, 2002).

By doing so, representatives from other departments can focus on solutions and not the architecture, if they choose. Keeping operations and strategies apart can cause a firm’ s underperformance. It is necessary to make a strategic operational plan and every participant of operations should be aware of each and step of a plan to keep things uniform. Once the authorized level of resources is determined by the managers, financial calculations become easier.

Works Cited

Lederer, A. L. & Sethi, V. (1991). Critical dimensions of strategic information systems planning. Decision Sciences, 22 (1), 104–119.

Tukana, S., & Weber, R. (1996). An empirical test of the strategic grid model of information systems planning. Decision Sciences, 27 (4), 735–765.

Slater, D. (2002). Strategic planning: Don’ts (and Do’s). Retrieved August 16, 2006 from http://www.cio.com/archive/060102/donts.html

Teo, T. S. H. & Ang, J. S. K. (2001). An examination of major IS problems. International Journal of Information Management, 21 (6), 457–470.

Feurer, R., et al. (2000). Aligning strategies, processes, and IT: A case study. Information Systems Management, 17 (1), 23–34.

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