Essays on Collaborative Border Management Coursework

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The paper "Collaborative Border Management" is a perfect example of business coursework.   Traditionally, the function of border management agencies such as customs has been to collect revenues and taxes on goods allowed into the country and keeping unwanted goods and individuals out. Due to the need for effective border management, the forces that drive the border management agenda have since changed. Collaborative border management is a model that is used in the achievement of the needed reforms. It is a broad term but it generally entails a description of how improved efficiency and effectiveness in terms of regulation can be achieved through greater coordination that exists between border agencies.

The relationship between regulatory authorities and trading community in the engagement at transport and supply chain sectors can be thought of as a foundation of collaborative border management. Borders foster legitimate trade between countries. Due to this, a new border management agenda deals with more than just customs clearance. One of the new agenda is the growing awareness of traders’ costs created by inefficient and outdated border formalities. Collaborative border management has benefits to the government and private sector.

Collaborative border management benefits the private sector by enabling speedy clearance and release of their goods at the border. On the other hand, the government benefits through the reduction of costs and increased integrity and transparency. Introduction The world is increasingly becoming a global place whereby key dynamics that influences the growth of economies and social developments are integration and interconnectedness. Trade is the number one driver that spurs economic growth. Producers are specializing and reaping the benefits associated with economies of scale through the integration of world markets.

Firms and households are also given the chance by trade to purchase knowledge, goods and services produced in any part of the world. It is for these reasons that policymakers are increasingly realising the need of having reform in trans-border regulation in order to remove bottlenecks and unnecessary barriers to trade. Collaborative border management is a model that is used in the achievement of the needed reforms. It is a broad term but it generally entails a description of how improved efficiency and effectiveness in terms of regulation can be achieved through greater coordination that exists between border agencies.

This essay discusses the nature of forces that drives the border management agenda and the benefits of collaborative border management to both the government and private sector. Border Management Border management is a complex task due to various players that are having conflicting interests. For many centuries, borders have functioned as a silent tribute to state sovereignty (Polner 2011, p. 49). Country competitiveness is largely determined by investment in national infrastructure and business environment as it determines production costs and therefore profits.

Removing unnecessary regulation and reduction of administrative red tape at the borders is crucial as part of the whole agenda of lowering operating costs. O’ Dowd (2002, p. 24) assert that borders are places where the political and economic opportunity for countries, agencies and other interest groups both legal and illegal. Different countries have different border environments with some retaining them as places of barriers while others acquired a new function of ‘ bridging’ (O’ Dowd 2002, p. 24).

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