Essays on Vodafone - Using Technology to Improve Economies Case Study

Download full paperFile format: .doc, available for editing

The paper "Vodafone - Using Technology to Improve Economies" is a great example of a marketing case study. Vodafone is one of the leading international mobile communications company in the world. The company is in operation in 67 countries currently and some are through partnership i. e Safaricom in Kenya. It has provided employment to thousands of people while serving millions of customers. Their vision is to be the number one leaders in the world of mobile communications (Tken & Michaelowa, 2008). Vodafone takes time to understand their customers and has come up with strategies that enhance their reputation as a company as well as build customer loyalty.

They have two unique business approaches which are to go further and expand their product that is introducing new things in an already saturated market and look for opportunities in new growing markets (Richter, 2002). The company is a product of technology which has to some extent contributed to improving economies. (Pour, 2006) An economy refers to a system that distributes the resources of a country to meet the consumer demand. The economy is divided into three main types as demonstrated below: Economic System Planned economy Mixed Economy Market Economy It is very important for a company like Vodafone to identify the type of economy its operations will be carried out with the aim of establishing their business there. In developed economies, Vodafone’ s business model is market-oriented and customer-focused.

Due to the fact, the economies are developed Vodafone adds value to the landlines. The demand for sophisticated products is high and the latest handsets which Vodafone strives to supply. Developing economies pose a lot of difficulty in Vodafone providing services (Paley, 2005).

The reason is because of the poor infrastructure and communications channels. Telephone landlines are scarce and almost impossible to install due to its expensive nature. Insecurity also plays a major role in slowing down such developments due to theft and vandalism of communication types of equipment. (Lee, 2010) Developed economies are the opposite of the developing economies but the impact of technology on developing countries is tremendous. This can be proven by the discovery of M-Pesa in Kenya where Vodafone played a part in creating and introducing it in the market (Reed, 1978). Kenya as a case study country for Vodafone formed a mobile communication company called Safaricom.

It was state-owned due to the 67% stake the government of Kenya had in the company which later reduced after it sold some to the public. Vodafone came into play in the company when it acquired 40% stake which until today is still there making them partners in the possession of the company. Since the partnership, Vodafone has made it possible to have network coverage in very remote areas countryside whereby it enhanced communication between people in the rural and urban areas (Idelman, & Dobbs, 1989).

M-Pesa which came to be after the partnership became a game-changer in the emerging market which today has spread its wings beyond the Kenyan borders. The platform has enabled small business traders and other working people in the country to have easy money transactions through their mobile phones. (Ricardo, 2001) This advantage has reduced insecurity and improved money movement in the economy contributing to its GDP growth. Safaricom provides M-pesa services to over 17 million subscribers and it is the world’ s biggest mobile payment system (Pour, 2006).

References

Tken, S., & Michaelowa, A. (2008). Corporate strategies and the clean development mechanism: developing country financing for developed country commitments? Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar.

Richter, T. (2002). Marketing mix standardisation in international marketing: an empirical investigation of the degree of marketing programme standardisation in German companies and its internal and external correlates. Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang.

Paley, N. (2005). The manager's guide to competitive marketing strategies (3rd ed.). London: Thorogood.

Reed, W. E. (1978). Telecommunication, economic studies a bibliography with abstracts. Springfield, Va.: U.S Dept. of Commerce, National Technical Information Service.

Idelman, S. A., & Dobbs, G. L. (1989). How to manage growth and maximize profits in outbound telemarketing. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice Hall.

Pour, M. (2006). Cases on telecommunication and networking. Hershey, PA: Idea Group Pub.

Bull, B. (2005). Aid, power and privatization: the politics of telecommunication reform in Central America. Cheltenham, UK: Northampton, MA. : Bull, B. (2005). Aid, power and privatization: the politics of telecommunication reform in Central America. Cheltenham, UK: Northampton, MA.

Stavroulakis, P. (2003). Reliability, survivability and quality of large scale telecommunication systems case study : Olympic Games. Chichester, England: John Wiley.

Richter, T. (2002). Marketing mix standardisation in international marketing: an empirical investigation of the degree of marketing programme standardisation in German companies and its internal and external correlates. Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang.

Ricardo, D. (2001). On the principles of political economy and taxation. London: Electric Book Co.

Uddin, S. (2010). Research in accounting in emerging economies. Bingley, U.K.: Emerald.

Ryan, D., & Jones, C. (2009). Understanding digital marketing marketing strategies for engaging the digital generation. London: Kogan Page.

Vulnerability in developing countries. (2009). Tokyo: United Nations University Press.

Handbook on the least developed country category: inclusion, graduation, and special support measures. (2008). New York: United Nations.

Lee, G. (2010). Business process management of Japanese and Korean companies. New Jersey: World Scientific.

Watanabe, C. (2009). Managing innovation in Japan the role institutions play in helping or hindering how companies develop technology. Berlin: Springer ;

King, L. (2009). African American culture and legal discourse. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

Gebreab, F. A. (2002). Getting connected: competition and diffusion in African mobile telecommunications markets. Washington, D.C.: World Bank, Development Research Group, Regulation and Competition Policy.

Download full paperFile format: .doc, available for editing
Contact Us