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Essays on Positioning and Branding of Eco-Shack Product - Consumer Segment in New Zealand, Business Segment Interested in Standard Eco-Shack Case Study

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The paper “ Positioning and Branding of Eco-Shack Product - Consumer Segment in New Zealand, Business Segment Interested in Standard Eco-Shack" is a fascinating variant of case study on marketing. This paper presents an analysis of a case study, where Eco-Shack, an eco-friendly housing facility, has been developed, and where the owners (Paul and Doug) are keen on improving the marketability of the products although they have no marketing experience. The paper discusses typical bases for market segmentation and identifies the customer segment for the Urban Eco-Shack in Australia. It further describes the business segment that could be interested in standard Eco-Shack.

In addition, it discusses how the Urban Eco-Shack product could be branded and positioned in the market. Further discussion on a cost-oriented approach is present in addition to a customer-based approach as an alternative pricing approach (Sharp, 2013). In the case study, Paul and Doug are keen on improving the marketability of the Urban Eco-Shack and the standard Eco-Shack, innovative and unique housing facilities that integrate environmental concepts. However, the owners have no marketing experience. In addition, attempts have been made to market the Eco-Shack products to the newspaper and advertisement websites to no success.

This paper discusses the possible options that both Paul and Doug should take (Sharp, 2013). Consumer Segment for Urban Eco-Shack in New ZealandThe Auckland-based house owners seem to be drawn to standard Eco-Shack than the Urban Eco-Shack on account of its environmental concepts. The prototype Urban Shack advertised in The New Zealand Herald and on Trade and Exchange has not been effective in achieving marketing the product. A possible solution is that a market segment should be performed. Segmenting the market refers to the process of identifying specific groups of customers who share certain characteristics or preferences within the broad-spectrum of the market.

The process involves dividing a market into sections or clusters that share a similarity or commonality in the types of customers they attract. The purpose is often to concentrate marketing force or energy on a particular market segment to gain a competitive edge within that segment (Civic Technologies, 2009). Concerning Urban Eco-Shack, market segmentation is an extensively broad concept that pervades the lifestyles, behaviors, economic status and preferences.

To identify new Zealand’ s market segment that could be interested in the Urban Eco-Shack, it would be critical to first identify and describe the standard bases essential for segmenting the market. Technically, the market can be segmented using four major segmentation bases that include demographic, geographic, behaviorist and psychographic bases. First, behaviorist and psychographic bases are applied in determining customer’ s demands or preferences for the Urban Eco-Shack and the marketing content. On the other hand, demographic and geographic bases determine the design of the Eco-Shack and the regional focus of the potential users.

More specifically, psychographic bases include examining the potential user’ s personality traits, such as interests, attitudes, and lifestyles. Towards this end, it can be argued that the consumer segment in New Zealand that would be interested in the Eco-Shack involves those who love traveling and who prefer temporary housing while on trips, such as eco-tourists. Behaviorist bases, on the other hand, include examining the attitudes of the potential customers towards the Eco-Shack, including the reasons for brand loyalty, the benefits of using the Eco-Shack and the customers’ willingness to purchase the housing.

Towards this end, it can also be argued that the consumer segment in New Zealand that would be interested in the Eco-Shack involves those who prefer could be customers who have used such temporary houses and who understand their benefits (Goodwin, 2012).  

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